Skywatching Archive
16 July 2015, 05:41 PM ET
Venus and the moon are currently shining as crescents in the night sky, and you can see the view with binoculars, if you have good weather and the right gear. Here's how.
15 July 2015, 10:11 AM ET
The online Slooh community observatory will webcast live views of Pluto today, July 15, at 5:30 p.m. ET, to celebrate the successful Pluto flyby by NASA's New Horizons. Here's how to watch it.
12 July 2015, 02:47 AM ET
NASA's New Horizons probe captured amazing images of Pluto, scientists revealed details about a proposed superpowerful space telescope and NASA announced its first four commercial-crew astronauts. Here are's top stories of the week.
11 July 2015, 01:16 AM ET
From gorgeous views of Pluto and its largest moon Charon to an amazing shot of the International Space Station crossing the moon's face, don't miss these amazing space images.
10 July 2015, 04:40 AM ET
Venus is putting on a show for skywatchers throughout July. Tonight (July 10), Earth's "sister planet" will be at its most luminous, blazing brightly in the western sky.
10 July 2015, 04:01 AM ET
A pre-dawn celestial pageant well worth getting up early to see will take place Sunday morning (July 12), with a lovely crescent moon in close proximity to one of the most beautiful star clusters.
09 July 2015, 07:00 AM ET
As the International Space Station (ISS) zoomed over Australia on June 30, Dylan O'Donnell captured this amazing view of the orbiting lab crossing in front of the moon.
08 July 2015, 07:01 AM ET
In anticipation of the New Horizons flyby of Pluto on July 14, this sky chart can help you find Pluto in the night sky (with the assistance of a high power telescope).
06 July 2015, 07:00 AM ET
A Japanese startup is developing a system to deliver artificial meteor showers that would be available for purchase by scientists and skywatchers.
05 July 2015, 07:00 AM ET
A set of sublime images from reader Saheed Jafari show Venus and Jupiter providing cosmic decorations during the month of Ramadan.
04 July 2015, 07:00 AM ET
A skywatcher's guide to the most formidable of thhe constellations, Scorpius (the Scorpion), which now lies low over the southern horizon as darkness falls.
02 July 2015, 04:45 PM ET
The constellation Scorpius has a 'reddish star at at its 'heart' and guards a treasure-trove of nigh sky targets. Venus and Jupiter hang low in the western sky and the annual Delta Aquarid meteor shower peaks at the end of the month.
02 July 2015, 04:12 PM ET
The constellation Sagittarius looks like a teapot and will be spew Milky Way 'steam' (aka center of our galaxy) this month. The area is frothy with nebulae, star clusters and, if you have a really good telescope, Pluto.
02 July 2015, 07:00 AM ET
After "sleeping" for 26 years, a black hole's activity lit up astronomical observatories on June 15,and it's still going on today.
01 July 2015, 03:00 PM ET
In anticipation of the New Horizons flyby of Pluto on July 14, this sky chart can help you find Pluto in the night sky (with the assistance of a high-power telescope).
01 July 2015, 07:01 AM ET
July offers opportunities to see Venus, Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury overhead. Here's how, and when, to spot them.
01 July 2015, 07:00 AM ET
If you've been watching the western sky just after sunset lately, you will have noticed two bright objects, gradually drawing closer. These are the two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter, and they're putting on a show this month.
01 July 2015, 12:00 AM ET
See amazing images of the night sky and cosmos in's gallery of cosmic images posted in June 2015.
30 June 2015, 03:44 PM ET
See what's up in the night sky for July 2015, including stargazing events and the moon's phases, in this gallery courtesy of Starry Night Software.
30 June 2015, 11:17 AM ET
The mysterious, multicolored sky light blazed up at 1:29 a.m. EDT Monday and was witnessed by skywatchers from Alabama to North Carolina — and by six NASA meteor-observing cameras. But this was no meteor.
30 June 2015, 10:12 AM ET
A bright object lit up the skies at 1:29 EST on June 29th, 2015 across multiple southeastern states.
30 June 2015, 07:00 AM ET
The two brightest planets in our sky — Venus and Jupiter — have been getting progressively closer to each other throughout June. Tonight (June 30), they will be a scant 20 arc minutes (0.33 degrees) apart.
28 June 2015, 10:55 AM ET
From the best-ever looks at Pluto and its largest moon Charon to gorgeous views of a supercharged northern lights display, don't miss these amazing space images.
28 June 2015, 07:00 AM ET
If you've ever struggled to identify Saturn in the night sky, be sure to look toward the horizon just after sunset tonight (June 28) see this often hard-to-spot planet.
27 June 2015, 12:00 PM ET
Look skyward around 11 p.m. local time this week to see an ancient star pattern almost directly overhead: the hero of legends, Hercules.
27 June 2015, 02:52 AM ET
For five hours, the sun's radiation created a stunning display over the dark skies of Maine.
26 June 2015, 01:00 PM ET
An active sunspot has been blasting coronal mass ejections in our direction, creating fantastic northern lights displays much further south than usual. In this case, Mike Taylor ( captured a multi-colored display.
25 June 2015, 12:58 PM ET
The northern lights, also known as the aurora borealis, painted the sky with brilliant ribbons of color this week, and the colorful displays could continue, following another solar explosion spotted by NASA.
25 June 2015, 07:00 AM ET
You can see the moon's famous Copernicus crater tonight (June 25) along the lunar terminator — the line that separates shadow from light.
24 June 2015, 06:00 PM ET
In anticipation of the New Horizons probe making a close flyby of Pluto on July 14, this sky chart can help you spot the dwarf planet in the night sky (with the assistance of a high-power telescope).
24 June 2015, 02:54 PM ET
Astrophotographer John Chumack ( captured about 1.5 hours of aurora images on March 31st, 2015, and time-lapsed them. He used a Canon 6D DSLR with a Star Adventurer panning device.
23 June 2015, 05:31 PM ET
Mercury is a difficult object to spot, because it's always clinging closely to the sun’s apron strings. So you might be excused for missing its brief appearance this week in the dawn skies.