Skywatching Archive
01 July 2015, 07:01 AM ET
July offers opportunities to see Venus, Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury overhead. Here's how, and when, to spot them.
01 July 2015, 07:00 AM ET
If you've been watching the western sky just after sunset lately, you will have noticed two bright objects, gradually drawing closer. These are the two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter, and they're putting on a show this month.
01 July 2015, 12:00 AM ET
See amazing images of the night sky and cosmos in Space.com's gallery of cosmic images posted in June 2015.
30 June 2015, 03:44 PM ET
See what's up in the night sky for July 2015, including stargazing events and the moon's phases, in this Space.com gallery courtesy of Starry Night Software.
30 June 2015, 11:17 AM ET
The mysterious, multicolored sky light blazed up at 1:29 a.m. EDT Monday and was witnessed by skywatchers from Alabama to North Carolina — and by six NASA meteor-observing cameras. But this was no meteor.
30 June 2015, 10:12 AM ET
A bright object lit up the skies at 1:29 EST on June 29th, 2015 across multiple southeastern states.
30 June 2015, 07:00 AM ET
The two brightest planets in our sky — Venus and Jupiter — have been getting progressively closer to each other throughout June. Tonight (June 30), they will be a scant 20 arc minutes (0.33 degrees) apart.
28 June 2015, 10:55 AM ET
From the best-ever looks at Pluto and its largest moon Charon to gorgeous views of a supercharged northern lights display, don't miss these amazing space images.
28 June 2015, 07:00 AM ET
If you've ever struggled to identify Saturn in the night sky, be sure to look toward the horizon just after sunset tonight (June 28) see this often hard-to-spot planet.
27 June 2015, 12:00 PM ET
Look skyward around 11 p.m. local time this week to see an ancient star pattern almost directly overhead: the hero of legends, Hercules.
27 June 2015, 02:52 AM ET
For five hours, the sun's radiation created a stunning display over the dark skies of Maine.
26 June 2015, 01:00 PM ET
An active sunspot has been blasting coronal mass ejections in our direction, creating fantastic northern lights displays much further south than usual. In this case, Mike Taylor (miketaylorphoto.com) captured a multi-colored display.
25 June 2015, 12:58 PM ET
The northern lights, also known as the aurora borealis, painted the sky with brilliant ribbons of color this week, and the colorful displays could continue, following another solar explosion spotted by NASA.
25 June 2015, 07:00 AM ET
You can see the moon's famous Copernicus crater tonight (June 25) along the lunar terminator — the line that separates shadow from light.
24 June 2015, 06:00 PM ET
In anticipation of the New Horizons probe making a close flyby of Pluto on July 14, this sky chart can help you spot the dwarf planet in the night sky (with the assistance of a high-power telescope).
24 June 2015, 02:54 PM ET
Astrophotographer John Chumack (galacticimages.com) captured about 1.5 hours of aurora images on March 31st, 2015, and time-lapsed them. He used a Canon 6D DSLR with a Star Adventurer panning device.
23 June 2015, 05:31 PM ET
Mercury is a difficult object to spot, because it's always clinging closely to the sun’s apron strings. So you might be excused for missing its brief appearance this week in the dawn skies.
23 June 2015, 11:34 AM ET
Auroras reached as far south as Philadelphia yesterday (June 22) after a massive burst of particles was ejected from the sun and pummeled Earth's atmosphere. This strong solar storm continues to rage, and auroras are expected be visible again tonight.
21 June 2015, 11:44 AM ET
From a breathtaking view of Saturn's Dione to the 'Spit of Satan,' check out these amazing space images.
21 June 2015, 11:33 AM ET
Crashed comet lander Philae phones home. A dead satellite falls to Earth. Mars shows both methane-laced meteorites and a possibly icy past, and the moon's dust gets a source in the best of this week's space news.
21 June 2015, 08:25 AM ET
Early summer is an "in-between" time in the skies. The realm of the galaxies has moved off to the west, but the summer Milky Way has not yet arrived. This is the best time of year to observe globular clusters and double stars.
21 June 2015, 07:21 AM ET
Dads everywhere will celebrate Father's Day today (June 21), and the Earth is joining the fun this year with the summer solstice, kicking off the first day of the northern summer.
19 June 2015, 09:46 PM ET
What better place to hold a star party than the rims of the Grand Canyon?
19 June 2015, 12:16 PM ET
Our galaxy shimmered over the national park in Arizona on June 20, 2011. Photography specs: sequence of 35 second exposures with Canon XSi, ISO 1600 and Nikon 16mm F/2.8 fisheye. Tracked during sequence with vertically-oriented old Celestron 5" fork.
12 June 2015, 04:10 PM ET
A low-cost telescope that takes its inspiration from Galileo — the famed Italian astronomer who discovered the moons of Jupiter in the 16th century — is once again available to celebrate the United Nations 2015 International Year of Light.
12 June 2015, 06:43 AM ET
The night sky features a swan, an eagle, a dove, a crane, a toucan, a peacock, a bird of paradise and even a mythical phoenix. And over toward the south as night falls during these late spring evenings is yet another: Corvus, the Crow.
12 June 2015, 06:30 AM ET
A skywatcher's guide to the constellation Ursa Minor, also known as the Little Dipper or the Little Bear. Most people have never seen the Little Dipper, simply because most of its stars are too dim to be viewed through light-polluted skies.
11 June 2015, 03:40 PM ET
Have you ever seen a real asteroid in the sky? This week is an excellent opportunity to see one of the largest asteroids, Pallas, as it reaches opposition to the sun.
11 June 2015, 11:57 AM ET
The planet Uranus will slip behind the moon today (June 11) in a celestial event known as an occultation, and you have a chance to watch it live at Slooh.com courtesy of the Slooh Community Observatory.
06 June 2015, 07:54 AM ET
If you've been watching the sky in the early evening lately, you can't have missed seeing the planet Venus in the west and now this planet is putting on brilliant show in the night sky.
05 June 2015, 05:03 PM ET
With the northern summer just a few weeks away, the month of June is bringing a delight of planets in the night sky for stargazers to enjoy, but only if weather permits and you know when and where to look.
05 June 2015, 10:18 AM ET
Space.com reader Jatin Thakkar sent in a photo of the Milky Way over the A. M. Foster Covered Bridge in Marshfield, Vermont.