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Total Solar Eclipse 2017: Path, Viewing Maps and Photo Guide

Path of Totality

Fred Espenak/NASA GSFC

Map showing the path of totality. Click through the following photos for more detailed maps of the eclipse's path through every state that will experience totality (Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina).

10 Great Places to See the Total Solar Eclipse

Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

This map highlights ten of the best cities to see the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017. [Want to See the 2017 Solar Eclipse? Better Book Your Hotel Room Now]

Oregon

Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

This map shows the path of the total solar eclipse through Oregon on Aug. 21, 2017.

Idaho

Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

This map shows the path of the total solar eclipse through Idaho on Aug. 21, 2017.

Wyoming

Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

This map shows the path of the total solar eclipse through Wyoming on Aug. 21, 2017.

Nebraska

Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

This map shows the path of the total solar eclipse through Nebraska on Aug. 21, 2017.

Kansas

Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

This map shows the path of the total solar eclipse through Kansas on Aug. 21, 2017.

Missouri

Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

This map shows the path of the total solar eclipse through Missouri on Aug. 21, 2017.

Illinois

Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

This map shows the path of the total solar eclipse through Illinois on Aug. 21, 2017.

Kentucky

Michael Zeiler, GreatAmericanEclipse.com

This map shows the path of the total solar eclipse through Kentucky on Aug. 21, 2017.

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Hanneke Weitering

Hanneke Weitering is an editor at Space.com with 10 years of experience in science journalism. She has previously written for Scholastic Classroom Magazines, MedPage Today and The Joint Institute for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After studying physics at the University of Tennessee in her hometown of Knoxville, she earned her graduate degree in Science, Health and Environmental Reporting (SHERP) from New York University. Hanneke joined the Space.com team in 2016 as a staff writer and producer, covering topics including spaceflight and astronomy. She currently lives in Seattle, home of the Space Needle, with her cat and two snakes. In her spare time Hanneke anjoys exploring the Rocky Mountains, basking in nature and looking for dark skies to gaze at the cosmos.