Save nearly $50 on these highly-rated astronomy binoculars

Celestron SkyMaster 25X100 Binocular
(Image credit: Amazon)

If you’re on the lookout for a new pair of astronomy binoculars, you’ll be pleased to know that Amazon has got you covered. With powerful 25x magnification and an impressive 100mm objective lens, these SkyMaster binoculars from Celestron are currently 12% off in the Amazon Spring Sale, saving you nearly $50. 

Save over $46 on these large astronomy binoculars when you order them from Amazon today.

These binoculars are a great choice for stargazers looking for a pair of larger-sized, more powerful binoculars. They appear in our best binoculars guide, feature two 100mm refractor telescopes and, as a result, provide incredible reach. That said, due to the sheer size of the design, they’re a little too large to be handheld. Thanks to their exceptional ability to gather light, these binoculars can offer brighter and more detailed celestial views, while their high magnification level means observing more detailed sights, like the moon’s craters, becomes far easier. 

The Celestron SkyMaster 25x100 binoculars are one of our favorite options for large astronomy binoculars. We think this deal is worth considering as you can save nearly $50. Check out our binoculars deals guide to see more top discounts.

Celestron SkyMaster 25X100 Binocular was $395 now $348.39 on Amazon

Celestron SkyMaster 25X100 Binocular <a href="https://target.georiot.com/Proxy.ashx?tsid=72128&GR_URL=https%3A%2F%2Famazon.com%2FCelestron-SkyMaster-25X100-Binoculars-carrying%2Fdp%2FB00008Y0VU%3Ftag%3Dhawk-future-20%26ascsubtag%3Dhawk-custom-tracking-20" data-link-merchant="Amazon US"" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">was $395 now $348.39 on Amazon

<a href="https://target.georiot.com/Proxy.ashx?tsid=72128&GR_URL=https%3A%2F%2Famazon.com%2FCelestron-SkyMaster-25X100-Binoculars-carrying%2Fdp%2FB00008Y0VU%3Ftag%3Dhawk-future-20%26ascsubtag%3Dhawk-custom-tracking-20" data-link-merchant="Amazon US"" data-link-merchant="Amazon US"" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Save nearly $50 off this highly rated pair of large-sized astronomy binoculars that come with 25x magnification, are water-resistant, and perfect for long-distance viewing.


Celestron SkyMaster 25X100 Binocular

Save nearly $50 on these highly-rated astronomy binoculars that are ideal for long-distance viewing (Image credit: Amazon)

While the SkyMaster binoculars by Celestron may not be quite as powerful as the best telescopes on the market for stargazing, their 25x magnification is still extremely impressive. What’s great about these binoculars is the fact that, with this magnification, you can see Jupiter’s atmospheric belts within the field of vision. 

These may not be suitable for beginner stargazers, but for serious astronomists, they’re a great option. While they boast some top-quality, crystal-clear views, they don’t usually come cheap, with a price tag of $395. Fortunately, there's a near-$47 discount on these binoculars right now, so if you're thinking of grabbing them, now is the right time to do so.

Key specs: Features massive 100mm objective lenses and powerful 25x magnification. They’re also water-resistant, have BaK-4 prisms, have a field of view of 156 feet and they have a comfortable 15mm eye relief. 

Consensus: We can't recommend these enough for experienced astronomers looking for a larger-sized pair of binoculars.

Buy if: You're an experienced stargazer who wants a pair of binoculars for long-distance astronomy viewing. 

Don’t buy if: You're looking for a more compact or portable pair of astronomy binoculars. 

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Beth Mahoney
Contributing writer

Beth Mahoney is a commerce, trends and SEO writer based in the UK. She has bylines at Glamour, HuffPost UK, Real Homes, and more. Beth has always been fascinated with the solar system and space travel, and can still remember the excitement and joy of watching her first total solar eclipse as a child.