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You can still save 20% on Lego Star Wars The Child (aka 'Baby Yoda') building set with this deal

The Lego Star Wars: The Child building set is on sale for Black Friday.
The Lego Star Wars: The Child building set is on sale for Black Friday. (Image credit: Walmart)

There's no doubt that the star of the Disney Plus series "The Mandalorian" is the character that viewers have affectionately dubbed "Baby Yoda." Now fans of the series can enjoy building their very own Lego model of the Star Wars icon. 

If you were looking for a Lego Grogu (it's his real name, after all) to call your own and missed the deep sales on Black Friday, you're in luck. This Lego Star Wars The Child build-and-display model is still on sale right now at Walmart for $64.00 (opens in new tab) at Walmart. (Check out our guide for the best Lego Star Wars deals for more options if The Child isn't strong enough with the Lego Force.)

This set of Lego bricks allows the gift recipient to assemble a 7.5-inch-tall (19 centimeters) model of Baby Yoda, a character officially known as The Child or Grogu. This Lego toy features a posable head, ears and mouth so the toy can be adjusted to show different expressions once assembled. 

Related: Lego Star Wars The Child review

The final finished model of The Child is conveniently sized so that it can be displayed easily in many parts of a child's room or home. 

This toy is recommended for children 10 years of age or older, but older enthusiasts will enjoy it as well. 

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Lego Star Wars The Child: $79.99 $64 at Walmart (opens in new tab)

This build-and-display Lego model features The Child from the Star Wars spinoff series The Mandalorian. Save 20% on this conveniently-sized model that will have fans of the series entertained well after they've assembled the final model.

Lego has been developing sets and figures from the Star Wars universe since 1999. This latest Star Wars toy set contains 1,073 pieces. Most of the bricks come either in green for The Child's skin or in beige for the character's cloak. 

The set includes clear but meticulous instructions to assemble the toy model. Many customers who have reviewed the toy on Walmart's website have said that assembling the product is the most enjoyable part. The final model is easy to display and some people have shared that they like how The Child's pose and expressions can be adjusted. One person did comment that there is a limit to how much you can play with the model, though. Most of the joy of the final model is seeing how cute it looks in the home. 

Some people also loved the details in the set. This Lego model comes with The Child's favorite toy: a gearshift knob from The Mandalorian's spacecraft. It can be fitted into The Child's hand. The set also comes with an information sign and a Lego minifigure of Grogu to complete the display. Some customers did find the cloak to be their least favorite part of the assembly because it was repetitive. Overall, most reviewers were delighted with the toy set. 

With more than 80 reviews on the Walmart website, the Lego Star Wars: The Mandalorian The Child Collectible Buildable Toy Model is rated as 4.8 out of 5. 

Be sure to check out Space.com's Space deals, or our guide to the best Lego space deals.

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Doris Elin Urrutia
Contributing Writer

Doris is a science journalist and Space.com contributor. She received a B.A. in Sociology and Communications at Fordham University in New York City. Her first work was published in collaboration with London Mining Network, where her love of science writing was born. Her passion for astronomy started as a kid when she helped her sister build a model solar system in the Bronx. She got her first shot at astronomy writing as a Space.com editorial intern and continues to write about all things cosmic for the website. Doris has also written about microscopic plant life for Scientific American’s website and about whale calls for their print magazine. She has also written about ancient humans for Inverse, with stories ranging from how to recreate Pompeii’s cuisine to how to map the Polynesian expansion through genomics. She currently shares her home with two rabbits. Follow her on twitter at @salazar_elin.