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Apollo 16: NASA's 5th Moon Landing with Astronauts in Pictures

At the Edge

NASA

Collecting lunar samples at the rim of Plum Crater, astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, is photographed holding a hammer by astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., lunar module pilot. The astronauts gathered a chip sample of the small boulder at center. On the far edge of the crater the Lunar Roving Vehicle is visible. The gnomon, seen near the boulder, is a tool used as a photographic reference to establish vertical sun angle, scale and lunar color.

"Moon"-buggy

NASA

On the lunar surface, astronaut John W. Young gives the Lunar Roving Vehicle gets a speed workout during the first of three Apollo 16 extravehicular activities at the Descartes landing site. The image comes from a frame of motion picture film taken by astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., holding a 16mm Maurer camera.

EVA Accomplished

NASA

As the third and final extravehicular activity of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission came to an end, astronauts John W. Young, commander, and Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, traversed the lunar service back to the Lunar Module and snapped this image of the moon's surface. In the center of the image, the Lunar Module sits "in the only flat place around," according to Young. In the background Stone Mountain stretches across half the horizon. In the foreground of the image the high gain antenna and the RCA television camera on the Lunar Roving Vehicle are visible.

Taking a Closer Look

NASA

On April 23, 1972, during the third EVA of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, takes samples and investigates a large lunar boulder at North Ray Crater near the Descartes landing site. While astronaut John W. Young, commander, took this image, a 70mm Hasselblad camera is visible strapped to Duke's chest.

Sa-Lute

NASA

On April 21, 1972 during the first EVA of NASA's fifth lunar landing mission, astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 mission, salutes the United States flag while jumping from the moon's surface. The image is taken from a color television transmission made by the color TV camera on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Beside the flag astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., stands.

Giving Respect

NASA

In the background of this April 21, 1972 image, Stone Mountain crosses most of the horizon. Front and center, astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., Apollo 16 lunar module pilot, salutes the U.S. flag. To the right of Duke, the Lunar Module and Lunar Roving Vehicle stand.

Panorama of the Lunar Surface

NASA

From the rim of North Ray Crater, at Stations 11-12, the color RCA TV camera on the Lunar Roving Vehicle captured this 360-degree field of view of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission landing site at Descartes. The image was captured during the mission's third and final EVA of the Apollo 16 mission. Notations on the image identify directions and key lunar terrain features. Astronauts John W. Young and Charles M. Duke Jr., can be seen in one of the frames. The camera itself was controlled remotely from the Mission Control Center console.

Lunar Surface Experiments

NASA

At the Descartes landing site on April 21, 1972, during the first of three extravehicular activities, the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package was deployed. Astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., lunar module pilot, photographed astronaut John W. Young, commander, at the site. The modules of the ALSEP — the lunar surface drill to the right, the drill's rack and bore stems to the left, the three-sensor Lunar Surface Magnetometer on the rear left, the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator, Heat Flow Experiment and central station — are scattered throughout the background.

Scenic View

NASA

From another position at Station 1 on the rim of Flag Crater, camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle, captured antlers 360-degree field of view of the Descartes landing site for the Apollo 16 mission. Notations on the image portray direction and the location of key lunar terrain features.

Earth in Enhanced Color

NASA

The original photo of Earth used for this color enhanced image was taken by astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 commander, using the UV camera created by the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. The geocoronoa — a halo of low density hydrogen surrounding Earth — is produced in far ultraviolet colors. The artificial red represents the faint hydrogen glow. At the lower left, the spike shows auroral activity at the south magnetic pole. The black sky around Earth is shown in the blue background.

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