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The Apollo 10 Mission: NASA's Lunar Landing Dress Rehearsal in Photos

Commander Stafford

NASA

Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, in this official NASA photo, was chosen as the prime crew commander for the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission.

Command Module Pilot

NASA

Astronaut John W. Young, in this official NASA photo, was chosen as the prime crew command module pilot for the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission.

Lunar Module Pilot

NASA

Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, in this official NASA photo, was chosen as the prime crew lunar module pilot for the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission.

All Smiles

NASA

Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, chosen as the prime crew lunar module pilot for the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission, smiles for this official NASA photo.

Off to the Races

NASA

On May 18, 1969, the prime crew for the Apollo 10 lunar orbital mission - from right to left, astronaut John W. Young, command module pilot, followed by astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander; and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot — enter the transfer van and head to Launch Complex 39, Pad B at Kennedy Space Center for launch.

Ready for Flight

NASA

On the night of May 4, 1969, the Apollo 10 — Spacecraft 106, Lunar Module 4 and Saturn 505 — stands at the ready on Pad B, Launch Complex 39 at Kennedy Space Center. The 363-foot tall Apollo/Saturn V stack will carry astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan on the lunar orbital mission.

Up and Away!

NASA

On May 18, 1969 at 12:49 p.m. ET, the Apollo 10 space vehicle launched from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39, Pad B. The prime crew made up of astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander; John W. Young, command module pilot; and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot orbited the moon for eight days in the second manned flight for NASA. Astronauts Stafford and Cernan descended in the Lunar Module to within 8 miles of the lunar surface.

Three in One

NASA

On May 22, 1969, during the Apollo 10 lunar orbital mission, the Command and Service Module floats in lunar orbit, as photographed from the Lunar Module. On the lunar surface, many bright craters are visible.

Another First

NASA

Aboard the Apollo 10 spacecraft a color television camera hitched a ride and this still image of the Apollo 10 Lunar Module and Saturn IVB stage after separation from the Command and Service Modules was taken from the first television transmission made from this camera.

Nearside of the Moon

NASA

On the lunar nearside, the Apollo 10 team photographed the Central Bay and Bruce, a 3.7 mile diameter crater. The features of this area are accented by the sun's low angle.

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