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2011 Solar and Lunar Eclipse Skywatching Guide
On Jan. 4, 2011, the moon passed in front of the sun in a partial solar eclipse - as seen from parts of Earth. Here, the joint Japanese-American Hinode satellite captured the same breathtaking event from space. The unique view created what's called an annular solar eclipse.
Credit: Hinode/XRT

There will be two total lunar eclipses and four partial solar eclipses in 2011.

January 4       Partial Solar Eclipse

This partial eclipse will be visible at sunrise in northwestern Europe and northwestern Africa, at midday in northeastern Africa and the Middle East, and at sunset in central Asia.

Times of maximum eclipse and magnitudes at major cities:

Berlin

08:27 UT

0.81

Cairo

08:31 UT

0.55

Helsinki

08:50 UT

0.85

Istanbul

08:37 UT

0.71

Kabul

09:52 UT

0.27

Karachi

09:46 UT

0.09

London

08:12 UT

0.75

Moscow

09:04 UT

0.81

Paris

08:09 UT

0.73

Vienna

08:25 UT

0.78

June 1             Partial Solar Eclipse

This partial eclipse is visible mainly in the high Arctic.

Times of maximum eclipse and magnitude at major cities:

Alert

21:36 UT

0.43

Hammerfest

21:30 UT

0.59

Harbin

20:01 UT

0.23

North Pole

21:21 UT

0.47

Reykjavík

22:01 UT

0.46

Sapporo

19:50 UT

0.08

St. John’s

22:39 UT

0.05

Trondheim

21:02 UT

0.05

June 15           Total Lunar Eclipse

This will be an almost central total lunar eclipse. The complete eclipse will be visible in most of Africa, the Middle East, and southern Asia, and parts of the eclipse will be visible throughout Africa, Europe, Asia, and Australia. Maximum eclipse will be at 20:13 UT.

July 1              Partial Solar Eclipse

This partial eclipse is visible only in a small area of ocean near Antarctica, south of Africa

November 25 Partial Solar Eclipse

This partial eclipse will be visible from southern South Africa, Antarctica, and New Zealand.

Times of maximum eclipse and magnitude at major cities:

Cape Town

04:53 UT

0.11

Dunedin

07:41 UT

0.19

Hobart

07:49 UT

0.06

McMurdo

06:52 UT

0.70

December 10  Total Lunar Eclipse

This total eclipse is well placed for observers in eastern Asia, Australia, and northwestern North America. It is will be visible at moonrise in Africa and Europe, and at moonset in North America. Maximum eclipse will be at 14:32 UT.

Source: RASC Observer's Handbook 2011

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