A Cosmic History: Vintage Space Photos Revealed (Gallery)

Goodacre’s 1910 Map of the Moon: Section 12

UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

This image shows Section 12 of the 1910 map of the moon publication by Walter Goodacre. Goodacre’s map of the moon is astonishingly detailed, and gives a glimpse back into the days when astronomy was not done with computers, spectrometers and CCD chips, but with human eyes, pens, paper, and the occasional piece of photographic film. [Read the Full Story Here]

Goodacre’s 1910 Map of the Moon: Section 13

UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

This image shows Section 13 of the 1910 map of the moon publication by Walter Goodacre. Goodacre’s map of the moon is astonishingly detailed, and gives a glimpse back into the days when astronomy was not done with computers, spectrometers and CCD chips, but with human eyes, pens, paper, and the occasional piece of photographic film. [Read the Full Story Here]

Goodacre’s 1910 Map of the Moon: Section 14

UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

This image shows Section 14 of the 1910 map of the moon publication by Walter Goodacre. Goodacre’s map of the moon is astonishingly detailed, and gives a glimpse back into the days when astronomy was not done with computers, spectrometers and CCD chips, but with human eyes, pens, paper, and the occasional piece of photographic film. [Read the Full Story Here]

Goodacre’s 1910 Map of the Moon: Section 15

UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

This image shows Section 15 of the 1910 map of the moon publication by Walter Goodacre. Goodacre’s map of the moon is astonishingly detailed, and gives a glimpse back into the days when astronomy was not done with computers, spectrometers and CCD chips, but with human eyes, pens, paper, and the occasional piece of photographic film. [Read the Full Story Here]

Goodacre’s 1910 Map of the Moon: Section 16

UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

This image shows Section 16 of the 1910 map of the moon publication by Walter Goodacre. Goodacre’s map of the moon is astonishingly detailed, and gives a glimpse back into the days when astronomy was not done with computers, spectrometers and CCD chips, but with human eyes, pens, paper, and the occasional piece of photographic film. [Read the Full Story Here]

Goodacre’s 1910 Map of the Moon: Section 17

UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

This image shows Section 17 of the 1910 map of the moon publication by Walter Goodacre. Goodacre’s map of the moon is astonishingly detailed, and gives a glimpse back into the days when astronomy was not done with computers, spectrometers and CCD chips, but with human eyes, pens, paper, and the occasional piece of photographic film. [Read the Full Story Here]

Goodacre’s 1910 Map of the Moon: Section 18

UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

This image shows Section 18 of the 1910 map of the moon publication by Walter Goodacre. Goodacre’s map of the moon is astonishingly detailed, and gives a glimpse back into the days when astronomy was not done with computers, spectrometers and CCD chips, but with human eyes, pens, paper, and the occasional piece of photographic film. [Read the Full Story Here]

Goodacre’s 1910 Map of the Moon: Section 19

UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

This image shows Section 19 of the 1910 map of the moon publication by Walter Goodacre. Goodacre’s map of the moon is astonishingly detailed, and gives a glimpse back into the days when astronomy was not done with computers, spectrometers and CCD chips, but with human eyes, pens, paper, and the occasional piece of photographic film. [Read the Full Story Here]

Goodacre’s 1910 Map of the Moon: Section 20

UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

This image shows Section 20 of the 1910 map of the moon publication by Walter Goodacre. Goodacre’s map of the moon is astonishingly detailed, and gives a glimpse back into the days when astronomy was not done with computers, spectrometers and CCD chips, but with human eyes, pens, paper, and the occasional piece of photographic film. [Read the Full Story Here]

Goodacre’s 1910 Map of the Moon: Section 21

UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

This image shows Section 21 of the 1910 map of the moon publication by Walter Goodacre. Goodacre’s map of the moon is astonishingly detailed, and gives a glimpse back into the days when astronomy was not done with computers, spectrometers and CCD chips, but with human eyes, pens, paper, and the occasional piece of photographic film. [Read the Full Story Here]

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