Postcards from Mars: The Amazing Photos of Opportunity and Spirit Rovers

Approaching a Target Deposit on Mars Crater Rim

NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to capture the component images for this 360-degree view near the ridgeline of Endeavour Crater's western rim [Read the Full Story Here]

Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in March 2014

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

A self-portrait of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity taken in late March 2014 (right) shows that much of the dust on the rover's solar arrays has been removed since a similar portrait from January 2014 (left).

Self-Portrait by Freshly Cleaned Opportunity Mars Rover in March 2014

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

This self-portrait of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows effects of wind events that had cleaned much of the accumulated dust off the rover's solar panels. It combines multiple frames taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) through three different color filters from March 22 to March 24, 2014, the 3,611th through 3,613th Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's work on Mars.

Opportunity Rover's Marathon-Length Traverse

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/NMMNHS

On Mars since January 2004, NASA's Opportunity Mars rover passed the distance of a marathon race in total driving on March 24, 2015.

Opportunity's Marathon Journey Infographic

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

This infographic displays some highlights along the route as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove as far as the length of a marathon race during the first 11 years and two months after it landed in Eagle Crater in January 2004.

Self-Portrait by Freshly Cleaned Opportunity Mars Rover, False Color

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

A self-portrait of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity taken by the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) shows effects of recent winds removing much of the dust from the solar arrays. This version of the image is presented in false color to make differences in surface materials easier to see. Image released April 17, 2014.

Where Martian 'Jelly Doughnut' Rock Came From

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

This image from the panoramic camera on NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows where a rock called "Pinnacle Island" had been before it appeared in front of the rover in early January 2014. This image was taken on Feb. 4, 2014. [See full story.]

Opportunity's Southward View of 'McClure-Beverlin Escarpment' on Mars

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

The boulder-studded ridge in this scene recorded by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is "McClure-Beverlin Escarpment." This view toward the south is a mosaic of images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) on Dec. 25, 2013. [See full story.]

Mars Rover Opportunity Self Portrait: 2014

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recorded the component images for this self-portrait about three weeks before completing a decade of work on Mars. The rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) took the images between Jan. 3 and Jan. 6, 2014.

'Pinnacle Island' Rock on Mars

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

This before-and-after pair of images of the same patch of ground in front of NASA's Mars Rover Opportunity 13 days apart documents the arrival of a strange, bright rock at the scene. The rock, called "Pinnacle Island," is seen in the right image on Jan. 8, 2014. The image at left was taken on Dec. 26, 2013. [Read the Full Story of the Mars Mystery Rock Here.]

Have a news tip, correction or comment? Let us know at community@space.com.