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Postcards from Mars: The Amazing Photos of Opportunity and Spirit Rovers

Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol

NASA/ JPL-Caltech

This 360-degree panorama assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exporation Rover Opportunity shows terrain surrounding the position where the rover spent its 3,000th Martian day, or sol, working on Mars on July 2, 2012.

Opportunity Rover Pancam Panorama

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.

817 component images taken between Dec. 21, 2011, and May 8, 2012, taken by Mars Rover Opportunity combine in this image. Image released July 5, 2012.

Opportunity Rover Pancam Panorama

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.

817 component images taken between Dec. 21, 2011, and May 8, 2012, taken by Mars Rover Opportunity combine in this image. Image released July 5, 2012.

Opportunity Rover Captures Own Shadow, Giant Mars Crater

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity catches its own late-afternoon shadow in this dramatically lit view eastward across Endeavour Crater on Mars. The rover used the panoramic camera (Pancam) between about 4:30 and 5:00 p.m. local Mars time (mostly on March 9, 2012) to record images taken through different filters and combined into this mosaic view. [More Mars Photos by Opportunity Rover]

Greeley Haven, Opportunity Rover's Overwintering Site

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State University

NASA's Opportunity rover will spend the Martian winter of 2012 at a spot called Greeley Haven, shown here in a false-color view to emphasize differences in composition. The rocks of Greeley Haven stand out in blue-gray tints; in the background at right lies a tan patch of sand.

Mars' Odyssey Crater

NASA/JPL-Caltech

The smaller Odyssey crater, perched on the rim of the giant crater, Endeavour, was one of the sites examined by Opportunity. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity arrived at the rim of Endeavour crater on Aug. 9, 2011.

View Across Endeavour Crater

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera to capture this raw vista looking across Endeavour crater during the rover's 2,686th Martian day, or sol, of work on Mars (Aug. 14, 2011). This photo was taken three days after Opportunity arrived at the crater following a 3-year trek.

Homestake Small Rocky Outcropping

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU

An examination of the small rocky outcropping known as Homestake revealed mineral deposited created by the flow of water. The cracks within this rock could potentially host life. The exposures for this image were taken during the 2,769th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's career on Mars (Nov. 7, 2011).

Opportunity Spies Minerals

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

This view from the front hazard-avoidance camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's arm's shadow falling near a bright mineral vein informally named "Homestake."

Mars Rover Opportunity Rests by Santa Maria Crater — Close-up

NASA/JPL/UA

Spirit and Opportunity, the Mars rovers, have outlived and outlasted any spacecraft on the surface of the red planet. Take a look at some of their latest Mars photos.

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Tariq is the Editor-in-Chief of Space.com and joined the team in 2001, first as an intern and staff writer, and later as an editor. He covers human spaceflight, exploration and space science, as well as skywatching and entertainment. He became Space.com's Managing Editor in 2009 and Editor-in-Chief in 2019. Before joining Space.com, Tariq was a staff reporter for The Los Angeles Times covering education and city beats in La Habra, Fullerton and Huntington Beach. He is also an Eagle Scout (yes, he has the Space Exploration merit badge) and went to Space Camp four times as a kid and a fifth time as an adult. He has journalism degrees from the University of Southern California and New York University. To see his latest project, you can follow Tariq on Twitter.