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3D Printing In Space: A New Dimension (Photo Gallery)

3-D Printing Device Could Build Moon Base from Lunar Dust

D-Shape

This 6-foot-tall (2 meter) gazebo was built with D-shape 3-D printing technology. The monolithic sandstone structure was made of about 200 thin layers and is shown unfinished (left) and after a week of finishing by hand. It was designed to look like a micro-organism called Radiolaria. The structure in the background, overhead, is the printing device.

Lunar Base With Earthrise

ESA/Foster + Partners

An artist's illustration of what a base on the moon might look like. The European Space Agency is investigating the possibility of 3D printing lunar habitats.

Monolite D-Shape Printer for ESA's Lunar Base

ESA

ESA and partners used this 3D printer to print a piece of the possible lunar home.

Mosaic of the Lunar South Pole

ESA

The European Space Agency and a consortium of industry professionals investigated the feasibility of using 3D printing to build a lunar base.

1.5 Metric Ton Building Block

ESA

This 2,205 pound (1,000 kilograms)test-print is made from simulated lunar dirt and resembles a cross section of what the lunar home could look like.

ESA-N. Vicente

Pieces like the example in this photo were shown in the London Science Museum, UK, on Oct. 15 where international experts presented the world’s largest metal 3D-printing project, lead by ESA and the EU. AMAZE – Additive Manufacturing Aiming Towards Zero Waste & Efficient Production of High-Tech Metal Products – involves 28 industrial partners across Europe. 3D printing builds a solid object from a series of layers, each one printed on top of the last. This ‘additive manufacturing’ technique produces very complex structures with minimal waste and maximum flexibility.

3D Printing Project Participant Amazed at Press Event

ESA-N. Vicente

ESA and the European Commission have embarked on a project to perfect the printing of space-quality metal components. The AMAZE project – Additive Manufacturing Aiming Towards Zero Waste and Efficient Production of High-Tech Metal Products – involves 28 industrial partners across Europe.

3D Printed Item at ESA’s AMAZE Press Event

ESA-N. Vicente

Pieces like the example in this photo were shown in the London Science Museum, UK, on Oct. 15 where international experts presented the world’s largest metal 3D-printing project, lead by ESA and the EU. AMAZE – Additive Manufacturing Aiming Towards Zero Waste & Efficient Production of High-Tech Metal Products – involves 28 industrial partners across Europe. 3D printing builds a solid object from a series of layers, each one printed on top of the last. This ‘additive manufacturing’ technique produces very complex structures with minimal waste and maximum flexibility.

AMAZE Participant Eyes 3D-Printed Piece

ESA-N. Vicente

A participant observes a 3D printed metallic object at a press conference at the London Science Museum, UK, Oct. 15 where an international panel of experts presented the world’s largest metal 3D printing project lead by ESA and the European Union. The AMAZE project – Additive Manufacturing Aiming Towards Zero Waste and Efficient Production of High-Tech Metal Products – involves 28 industrial partners across Europe.

ESA-N. Vicente

Pieces like the example in this photo were shown in the London Science Museum, UK, on Oct. 15 where international experts presented the world’s largest metal 3D-printing project, lead by ESA and the EU. AMAZE – Additive Manufacturing Aiming Towards Zero Waste and Efficient Production of High-Tech Metal Products – involves 28 industrial partners across Europe. 3D printing builds a solid object from a series of layers, each one printed on top of the last. This ‘additive manufacturing’ technique produces very complex structures with minimal waste and maximum flexibility.

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