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Photos of Pluto and Its Moons

Pluto Seen by New Horizons, July 11, 2015 (Annotated)

NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Annotated version of the Pluto photo taken by New Horizons on July 11, 2015, showing linear features that may be cliffs, as well as a large circular feature that could be an impact crater.

Pluto Seen by New Horizons, July 11, 2015

NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Image of Pluto captured by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft on July 11, 2015. The photo shows linear features that may be cliffs, as well as a large circular feature that could be an impact crater.

Charon, July 8, 2015

NASA-JHUAPL-SWRI

This image of Charon was obtained by New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on July 8, 2015.

Pluto and Charon, July 8, 2015

NASA-JHUAPL-SWRI

New Horizons captured Pluto and Charon from a distance of about 3.7 million miles (6 million kilometers) on July 8, 2015.

Pluto and Charon in Color, July 8, 2015

NASA-JHUAPL-SWRI

This image of Pluto (right) and Charon, taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft on July 8, 2015, combines a view captured by the probe’s long-range camera with color information obtained earlier in the mission from the Ralph instrument.

Pluto, July 8, 2015

NASA-JHUAPL-SWRI

New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) captured Pluto on July 8, 2015. The bright edge below the dark “whale” is real, not the result of image processing.

Heart-Shaped Area on Pluto

NASA-JHUAPL-SWRI

New Horizons took this image on July 7, 2015, at a distance of just under 5 million miles (8 million kilometers) from Pluto. A large heart-shaped bright area appears at right. [Read full story.]

Pluto Unveiled

NASA, ESA, and M. Buie (Southwest Research Institute)

This is the most detailed view to date of the entire surface of the dwarf planet Pluto, as constructed from multiple NASA Hubble Space Telescope photographs taken from 2002 to 2003. The center disk (180 degrees) has a mysterious bright spot that is unusually rich in carbon monoxide frost. The image was released in February 2010. See the dwarf planet turn in a video based on these images.

Map of Pluto

NASA-JHUAPL-SWRI

This map of Pluto was created from images taken from June 27 – July 3, 2015, by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons spacecraft, incorporating lower-resolution color data from the spacecraft’s Ralph instrument. [Read full story.]

High-Resolution Views of Pluto by NASA’s New Horizons

NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

These high-resolution views of Pluto were by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, obtained between July 1 and 3, 2015. [Read the full story.]

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