Cosmic Rockers Unite in Honor of 'Starman' David Bowie
Cosmic rockers honor music icon David Bowie.
Credit: David Bowie official Facebook page

Steve Spaleta, Space.com senior producer, contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights.

What did Dave Bowie mean to you? To me, he was a radical idea, a man with vision and of many characters. He was the embodiment of imagination. He influenced a generation and left an indelible mark on those who appreciated his art.

Some artists who drank the "Starman" juice went on to create a place of their own in the world that Bowie knew all too well, Rock 'n' Roll. A subsection of them found inspiration through otherworldly visuals, scientific achievement and exploration. 

Singer/songwriter Grace Potter and Claudio Sanchez, founder/singer/songwriter of Coheed and Cambria, fit that mold and were influenced by David Bowie. They paid tribute to him through words and music. 

"Bowie created a soundtrack for those who were curious, for the people who weren't satisfied with this world or what it contained," said Sanchez via email. "Through his own exploration of self, we were encouraged to reach further, to be more. He was a chameleon, ever changing and otherworldly. He was a whole universe contained in one supernatural man." Coheed and Cambria is a band that has flown sci-fi concept records to new heights and has currently "landed" back on Earth for their latest effort, "Color Before the Sun."

Part of Grace Potter's tribute was a musical one. She covered David Bowie's song "As The World Falls Down" from the movie "Labyrinth." You can watch it on YouTube here

Potter also emailed a very poignant description of Bowie’s influence on her: "David Bowie was my first true love. Alien and deeply human all at once, he kept us riveted from one album to another. Every record, every film, every nuance of his performances gripped me and kept me wondering what would happen next. Always changing; yet true to character, he taught us that fantasy and reality both have equal power in life."

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Credit: SPACE.com

Grace is currently on a tour in support of new solo record, "Midnight," and has designed a space-themed wardrobe for live performances.

Other cosmically influenced artists said their farewells via social media and their own websites, as well. Guitar guru Joe Satriani, whose albums include "Surfing with the Alien" and "Crystal Planet," said via Twitter, "Thank you for the music, the inspiration and being so gracious David. R.I.P." (Satriani explained his "Strange and Beautiful (Space) Music" at Space.com's office in 2014.)

Guitarist Brian May, who collaborated with David Bowie on Queen's hit song "Under Pressure," had this to say via his website: "He was a fearsome talent, and the loss to Music and Culture from his passing is inestimatable. In and out of our lives, always challenging and innovative, and … shocking." He also adds "All hail, David Bowie, Star Man, Hero. RIP." May holds a Ph.D. in astrophysics, and his accolades include assembling the first stereoscopic view of Pluto along with being a six-string guitar hero.

I believe the artists above would agree, David Bowie's legacy will transcend the generations he walked with (or "floated above") on "Starship" Earth for 69 years. He'll certainly be remembered — a goal all true artists strive for as they traverse this microcosm of time and space. 

Follow Steve Spaleta on Twitter @SteveSpaleta. Follow all of the Expert Voices issues and debates — and become part of the discussion — onFacebook, Twitter and Google+. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. This version of the article was originally published on Space.com.