Best telescope mounts in 2023

Man and telescope against milkyway backdrop
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We take a look at the best telescope mounts the market has to offer this year. When choosing a new telescope, many buyers can be too focused on the optical tube assembly, while the mount can get completely overlooked. This is particularly the case with novice astronomers and those buying gifts. 

When it comes to choosing a telescope most potential buyers tend to concentrate on the optical tube assembly of itself. The telescope mount can often get completely overlooked, especially by the novice or someone buying a telescope as a present.

But, as those with more experience will know, the mounting that the telescope is on can be vital to the stargazing experience too. While optical tube assembly is important, a telescope mounted upon a poor quality or flimsy mount can lead to a hugely frustrating experience. Unfortunately, there are plenty of offerings that fall into this category. 

Fear not though, we've searched the internet and discovered the very best telescope mounts available at various price points. Whether you're looking for a basic manual alt-azimuth mount or a fully computerized go-to equatorial, there's something for everyone and every budget below. 

Below, you'll also find portable mount options for those who like to observe on-the-go or don't have a permanent observing spot. You'll find a range of different options in this guide as we take a look at the best telescope mounts on the market today.  

What type of mount should I buy?

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Telescope mounts come in a wide variety of designs. The most common types are: Alt-azimuth, German equatorial, Fork mounted equatorial and Dobsonian. See our summary at the bottom of this page to discover how each mount varies and what they're best for.

All of these types can be offered in manual, motorized, or computerized formats. The best choice depends upon your own observing requirements. For example, a manual mount such as a low-cost Dobsonian would be ideal for visual observing. For astrophotography, a motorized or computerized equatorial mount is desirable.

Sky-Watcher EQ 5 deluxe telescope mount

(Image credit: Sky-Watcher)
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Sky-Watcher EQ-5 Deluxe Mount and Tripod

This low-cost equatorial mount is a firm favorite among amateur astronomers and a true skywatching workhorse.

Specifications

Mount type: German Equatorial
Drive type: None. Manual slow motion controls on both axes (motor drive optional)
Best suited for: Binoculars or small telescopes below 8-inches (20cm) aperture
Maximum payload capacity: 7kg
Mount head fit: CG-5/Vixen dovetail
What's included: Mount head, tripod, and eyepiece accessory tray

Reasons to buy

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Good bang for the buck
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Ideal platform for a small telescope

Reasons to avoid

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Motor drives optional at additional cost
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Polar alignment scope at additional cost

Sky-Watcher's EQ-5 mount has long been used by amateur astronomers worldwide. Its modest size, low cost and array of features have made it among the most popular small telescope mounts ever produced. It is one of the most popular entry-level equatorial mounts on the market. The EQ-5 also comes as part of many small telescope packages offering the option to purchase a complete telescope with a proper astronomical mounting.

Above is featured the manual version, but for an additional cost dual-axis motor drives can be added enabling a great platform with which to venture into trying astrophotography. An optional polar scope is also available for fast and accurate polar alignment. The EQ-5 is a highly capable portable mount and is easily capable of holding most small telescope tubes up to around 20cm aperture.

Sky-Watcher EQ5 pro go-to telescope mount

(Image credit: Sky-Watcher)
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Sky-Watcher EQ-5 Pro GOTO Mount & Tripod

A fully motorized go-to mount that offers a great platform to star serious astrophotography

Specifications

Mount type: German Equatorial
Drive type: Dual-axis drives with full go-to capability
Best suited for: Small telescopes below 8-inches (20cm) aperture
Maximum payload capacity: 7kg
Mount head fit: CG-5/Vixen dovetail fit
What's included: Mount head, tripod, and eyepiece accessory tray, computer drive handset

Reasons to buy

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Great value for all the advanced features
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Portable and user-friendly

Reasons to avoid

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Payload capacity is somewhat light
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Not well suited to larger optical tubes

The fully computerized version of Sky-Watcher's EQ5 mount represents a great mount to venture into the world of astrophotography with. Along with dual axis motor drives, it offers full go-to capability with a large object database. Multiple tracking rates are also available as is an autoguider port for long-exposure deep-sky imaging. 

The EQ-5 performs best of all with small telescope tubes. Refractors below 5-inches (13cm) and reflectors below 8-inches (20cm) are the best fit for this mount. For example, it is perfectly capable of providing a solid platform for the highly popular 8-inch (20cm) Schmidt Cassegrain telescope. The EQ-5 is also highly portable and is an ideal choice for those without a permanent observing site.

Celestron Advanced VX go-to telescope mount

(Image credit: Celestron)
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Celestron Advanced VX GOTO Equatorial Mount

A fully motorized go-to mount that offers advanced features for the price

Specifications

Mount type: German Equatorial
Drive type: Dual axis drives with full go-to capability
Best suited for: Small telescopes below 9-inches (23cm) aperture
Maximum payload capacity: 9kg
Mount head fit: CG-5/CGE dual fit
What's included: Mount head, tripod, and eyepiece accessory tray, computer drive handset

Reasons to buy

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Superb value for a highly capable mount
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Easy to use

Reasons to avoid

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Best performance is found with small optical tubes of 10kg or less

Celestron's Advanced VX mount is a modern revision of their popular CG-5 mount and a direct competitor to the Sky-Watcher EQ-5. It offers an array of advanced features and a slightly increased payload capacity meaning larger optical tubes can be used. For example, Celestron offers this mount as part of a package with their popular C8 Schmidt Cassegrain for which it is well suited.

The slewing and tracking accuracy of the VX mount is also impressive and the control system is very user-friendly and easy to get to grips with. The polar alignment method available using the telescope software is easily accomplished and results in accurate alignment. Overall the VX mount is a great platform for most small telescopes and is one of the best available at its price point.

Celestron heavy duty alt-az telescope mount product image

(Image credit: Celestron)

Celestron Heavy Duty Alt-Azimuth Tripod

Celestron's heavy-duty alt-aziumuth tripod is an ideal entry-level mount for visual observers.

Specifications

Mount type: Alt-azimuth
Drive type: None. Manual slow motion controls on both axes
Best suited for: Binoculars or small telescopes below 5-inches (13cm) aperture
Maximum payload capacity: 6kg
Mount head fit: Tripod fit 1/4-inch to 20 thread mounting bolt retained in the plate
What's included: Tripod, accessory tray and tripod head

Reasons to buy

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Very low cost
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Multitude of different uses. 

Reasons to avoid

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No motor drive 
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Only suitable for lightweight binoculars or small telescopes

The Celestron Heavy Duty Alt-Azimuth tripod is an ideal entry-level mounting for binoculars or small telescopes. It offers manual slow-motion controls for fine adjustments and its standard camera tripod mounting bracket allows quick attachment of many small telescopes, binoculars or cameras.

Though the simplest entry of the six mounts we look at here, it's a sturdy and solid tripod that will nicely hold a small telescope in the 3-inch to 5-inch (7-13cm) aperture range. The addition of slow-motion controls is useful, especially for observing objects at higher magnifications. Overall, this is a nice low-cost mount for those just starting out, or anyone looking for a quick 'grab and go' mount for a small telescope or binoculars.

Sky-Watcher AZEQ 6GT telescope mount

(Image credit: Sky-Watcher)
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Sky-Watcher AZ-EQ6GT GOTO Dual Mount

A fully motorized go-to mount that can operate in both alt-az and equatorial modes

Specifications

Mount type: Dual option Alt-Azimuth/German Equatorial
Drive type: Dual-axis drives with full go-to capability
Best suited for: Small telescopes below 12-inches (30cm) aperture
Maximum payload capacity: 25kg
Mount head fit: Dual fit 45mm and 75mm dovetail plates
What's included: Mount head, tripod, polar scope, computer drive handset

Reasons to buy

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Operate in either equatorial or alt-az
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Excellent tracking accuracy for the price

Reasons to avoid

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Beginners may find design confusing
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Supplied tripod could be better

The AZ-EQ6GT mount is the latest incarnation of Skywatcher's much-used EQ6 mount. This mount has proven hugely popular over the past two decades, and this latest version offers some great features. The ability to operate in either equatorial or alt-azimuth works well and its decent payload capacity means many different telescopes can be mounted to it.

The mount also has a neat feature of the user being able to move the telescope around manually without the mount losing its positional information meaning it can be slewed using the motors or pushed by hand. The quote payload capacity is impressive and well above the entry-level mounts such as the EQ-5. The EQ-6, in any form, is a great choice for the more serious amateur astronomer and this latest version is a great addition.

Losmandy G11 telescope mount

(Image credit: Losmandy)
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Losmandy G-11 Equatorial Mount

This long-time classic remains a superb choice for the serious amateur astronomer

Specifications

Mount type: German Equatorial
Drive type: Dual-axis drives with full go-to capability
Best suited for: Telescopes up to 14-inches (36cm) aperture
Maximum payload capacity: 28kg
Mount head fit: Losmandy large dovetail fit
What's included: Mount head, heavy-duty tripod, computer drive and handset

Reasons to buy

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Superb build quality
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A telescope mount for almost any amateur telescope

Reasons to avoid

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An expensive option for any skywatcher
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Quite heavy, though still portable

The Losmandy G-11 mount is one of the most popular serious telescope mounts of the past few decades. Its superb build quality and great performance has garnered a loyal following over the years. The latest version offers dual-axis go-to slewing via the Gemini 2 system. It can also carry larger telescopes and is an ideal platform for serious astrophotographers.

Having been a long-time owner and user of the G-11 mount its flexibility, performance and build quality put it among the best serious mounts available. You can also order the mount with a high-quality polar alignment scope which allows fast and very accurate alignment for those who do not have a permanent observing site. Overall, a superb choice for the more serious or experienced observer.

Summary

There are different mounts to account for different types of skywatching and stargazing techniques, each with their own unique uses.  Alt-azimuth mounts are the most basic, offering a design whereby the telescope is moved in a horizontal or vertical motion to locate objects. These mounts can come in either manual or computerized formats. Typically most Dobsonian's are manual alt-azimuth mounts with fork-mounted Schmidt Cassegrains being computerized alt-azimuth.

The German equatorial mount is probably the most popular telescope mount design for amateur size telescopes. The equatorial mount compensates for Earth's rotation by having one axis aligned to the celestial pole allowing a motor drive to move the telescope in sync with the apparent motion of the night sky. This allows the telescope to keep track of any celestial target for long periods allowing astrophotography to be attempted.

The fork-mounted equatorial is often found these days as an option for computerized Schmidt Cassegrain whereby the fork-mounted telescope will sit on a wedge allowing it to be aligned to the celestial pole.

This type of mounting is a variation on the alt-azimuth design specially for Newtonian reflecting telescopes. These are available in simple manual push-pull design or fully computerized with object tracking and go-to.

As mentioned above the type of mount you require will depend upon exactly what you want to do, but there are a few rules that apply regardless of the mount you choose. Those are:

Make sure the mount is not seriously under-sized for the telescope it carries. Unstable mounts can be hugely frustrating. Don't choose something way above your knowledge/experience level. Once again you'll likely end up frustrated. When buying the mount and telescope separately don't spend 90% of your budget on the telescope and the remaining 10% on the mount. A good mount that matches the size and weight of the telescope is important.

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Damian Peach

Damian A. Peach FRAS  is a British amateur astronomer, astrophotographer, lecturer and author. Best known for his photographs of a wide variety of astronomical objects. His career in the field spans over thirty years.

Peach's passion for Astronomy first began in 1988 inspired by books in his school library. Later he joined the British Astronomical Association (BAA) in 1996 and since then has contributed large amounts of observations to the various observing sections and also written and co-authored many papers in the organization's journal. He was awarded the organization's prestigious Merlin Medal in 2006. The same year he was also awarded the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers (ALPO) Walter H. Haas award for his contributions.

Peach has provided astronomical images for magazines and books throughout his career. His images have been featured in Astronomy Magazine, Sky & Telescope, Astronomy Now & The Sky at Night. He has also authored articles on astrophotography for these magazines. Peach has also been a co-author on several professional scientific papers on planetary astronomy, especially regarding work on Mars and Jupiter. He was one of only a few amateur astronomers to have work featured as part of the national Explorers of the Universe exhibition at the Royal Albert Hall in 2007. His work has also appeared at the Edinburgh Science Festival, and The Royal Greenwich Observatory.

Peach's work has also been used by NASA and ESA to illustrate what ground-based telescopes can achieve in photographing the planets, and the support they can provide to professional space probe missions.