NASA unveiled its 2015 budget request on Tuesday (March 4), a $17.5 billion spending plan that would maintain the space agency's major ongoing missions. See Space.com complete coverage of NASA's 2015 budget request here:

Big Story:  NASA's $17.5 Billion Budget Request for 2015 Would Fund New Science Missions, Ground Flying Telescope
NASA's 2015 budget would remain essentially flat at $17.5 billion under a White House spending proposal unveiled today (March 4). It maintains the agency's biggest space programs, lays groundwork for major new astrophysics and planetary science. From our news partner SpaceNews.

Multimedia:
How NASA Will Spend Your Money | Video

NASA Space Tech, Science & Exploration Goals in 2015 in Pictures (Gallery)

NASA budget Coverage

Wednesday, March 5

NASA's SOFIA Flying Telescope May Be Mothballed This Year  
A flying astronomical observatory will be grounded later this year unless outside funding can be found for the project, NASA officials announced Tuesday (March 4).

Related: Photos from SOFIA, NASA's Flying Telescope: Gallery

NASA Eyes Ambitious Mission to Jupiter's Icy Moon Europa by 2025  
NASA hopes to launch a mission to the Jupiter moon Europa, perhaps the solar system's best bet to host alien life, a decade or so from now, officials announced Tuesday (March 4).

Tuesday, March 4

Russia-Ukraine Tension Won't Affect US Astronauts on Space Station, NASA Chief Says
An upcoming launch and landing of astronauts to and from the International Space Station will not be affected by the current tensions between the U.S. and Russia.

NASA's $17.5 Billion Budget Request for 2015 Would Fund New Science Missions, Ground Flying Telescope
NASA's 2015 budget would remain essentially flat at $17.5 billion under a White House spending proposal unveiled today (March 4). It maintains the agency's biggest space programs, lays groundwork for major new astrophysics and planetary science. From our news partner SpaceNews.

Expert Voices: Reactions to NASA's 2015 Budget Request for Space Exploration
NASA unveiled its 2015 budget request on Tuesday (March 4), a $17.5 billion spending plan that would maintain the space agency's major ongoing missions, while supporting ambitious new science missions. See reactions to the new NASA budget.

NASA's building blocks for a mission to Mars encompass a series of missions that will expand U.S. space capabilities to the point where humans can safely travel to the Red Planet. Today, NASA is working with commercial partners to obtain affordable access to low Earth orbit from U.S. companies and learning the fundamentals of living and working in space about the International Space Station. NASA will begin travelling beyond Earth orbit in September 2014 with the first flight of the Orion spacecraft, then in a few years redirect an asteroid to high lunar orbit for scientific studies. Earth independent missions, such as flying humans to Mars, are expected in the 2030s. Image released March 4, 2014.
NASA's building blocks for a mission to Mars encompass a series of missions that will expand U.S. space capabilities to the point where humans can safely travel to the Red Planet. Today, NASA is working with commercial partners to obtain affordable access to low Earth orbit from U.S. companies and learning the fundamentals of living and working in space about the International Space Station. NASA will begin travelling beyond Earth orbit in September 2014 with the first flight of the Orion spacecraft, then in a few years redirect an asteroid to high lunar orbit for scientific studies. Earth independent missions, such as flying humans to Mars, are expected in the 2030s. Image released March 4, 2014.
Credit: NASA

Highlights of NASA's 2015 Budget Request Unveiled
The proposed 2015 federal budget released by the White House today (March 4) allocates $17.5 billion to NASA, a $200 million drop from the space agency's 2014 budget request.

NASA Chief Charles Bolden's View on 2015 Budget Request
NASA unveiled its 2015 budget request today (March 4), a request that seeks $17.5 billion for the agency. See NASA chief Charles Bolden's view of the agency's 2015 budget plan.

Email Tariq Malik at tmalik@space.com or follow him @tariqjmalik and Google+. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+.