The potentially dazzling Comet ISON made its closest pass with the sun on Thanksgiving Day (Nov. 28). ISON will make its closest approach to the sun — called perihelion — on Nov. 28 at 1:38 p.m. EST (1838 GMT). Photos of Comet ISON: A Potentially Great Comet

Editor's Update for Dec. 11:  RIP Comet ISON, we miss you. Comet ISON has officially been declared extinct after its close slingshot around the sun on Nov. 28. Initial hopes that some of the comet survived the solar passage were short-lived as it soon became clear the comet was destroyed by the sun encounter. Read the Latest Story:  Scientists Declare Famous 'Sungrazer' Dead After Sun Encounter

 

You can follow the latest Comet ISON news, photos and video on SPACE.com. If you snap an amazing picture of Comet ISON or any other night sky view that you'd like to share for a possible story or image gallery, send photos, comments and your name and location to managing editor Tariq Malik at spacephotos@space.com.

This stunning portrait of Comet ISON, officially designated as C/2012 S1, was captured by John Nassr on Nov. 15 from his Stardust Observatory in Baguio City in the Philippines. Nassr used a Nikon D7000 digital SLR camera coupled to his custom-built 16-inch f/4.5 Newtonian reflector to record the sungrazing comet’s intricate tail. The image is a combination of five 1-minute-long exposures at ISO 6400.
This stunning portrait of Comet ISON, officially designated as C/2012 S1, was captured by John Nassr on Nov. 15 from his Stardust Observatory in Baguio City in the Philippines. Nassr used a Nikon D7000 digital SLR camera coupled to his custom-built 16-inch f/4.5 Newtonian reflector to record the sungrazing comet’s intricate tail. The image is a combination of five 1-minute-long exposures at ISO 6400.
Credit: John Nassr

An ISON Observer's Guide: How to See ISON's Thanksgiving Day Encounter
Be sure to read these helpful tips and tricks before you head out to find Comet ISON on Thanksgiving Day. SPACE.com Skywatching Columnist Joe Rao also details the best forecasts for what the comet will look like after its close brush with the sun.

Science of a Comet: ISON Has Scientists Fired Up
The promising Comet ISON's close pass by the sun this week has amateur astronomers on the edge of their seats, but professional scientists are anticipating the celestial encounter with perhaps even greater relish.

PHOTOS: Incredible Photos of Comet ISON
Amateur observers and professionals have taken some amazing photos of Comet ISON as it barrels through the inner solar system. See photos of ISON taken by spacecraft orbiting Mars, Earth-bound observers and a probe orbiting Mercury here.

Reference: Comet ISON, Incoming Sungrazer
Scientists think that ISON is on its first pass through the inner solar system after leaving the Oort cloud — a mass of icy bodies on the outskirts of the solar system. Find out more about the science of the sungrazer here.

Multimedia

Photo Guide: How to Photograph Comet ISON

Infographic: Comet of the Century? Sun-Grazing Comet ISON Explained

Comet Quiz: Test Your Cosmic Knowledge

Comets of 2013: Amazing Comet Photos of 2013 by Stargazers

Comets are debris left over after the solar system formed 4.6 billion years ago. Let's see what you know about these ancient and elusive celestial wanderers.
True Color Image of Comet iSON
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Comet Quiz: Test Your Cosmic Knowledge
Comets are debris left over after the solar system formed 4.6 billion years ago. Let's see what you know about these ancient and elusive celestial wanderers.
True Color Image of Comet iSON
0 of questions complete

Videos

Optical image of the structures surrounding the nucleus of the Comet ISON, captured by FOCAS mounted on the Subaru Telescope. This image was taken in the early morning of Oct 31, 2013 in V-band (550 nm) with an exposure time of 5 seconds. The field of view is about 6 x 3 arcminutes.
Optical image of the structures surrounding the nucleus of the Comet ISON, captured by FOCAS mounted on the Subaru Telescope. This image was taken in the early morning of Oct 31, 2013 in V-band (550 nm) with an exposure time of 5 seconds. The field of view is about 6 x 3 arcminutes.
Credit: NAOJ/Observation and data reduction by Dr. Masafumi Yagi [NAOJ]

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Comet ISON's Growing Tails and Lovejoy's Coma Snapped by Photographer

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