Skip to main content

Photos of Comet ISON: A Potentially Great Comet

Comet ISON Survives Sun Flyby: Time-Lapse

ESA/NASA/SOHO/SDO/GSFC

The much-anticipated Comet ISON is passing through the inner solar system and could become a magnificent celestial object in the night sky for observers if it survives a Nov. 28 close encounter with the sun.

This time-lapse image shows Comet ISON approaching and leaving during its slingshot around the sun – represented by the white circle -- on Nov. 28, 2013. The ISON images clearly outline the curve of the comet's orbit path. The images were captured by ESA/NASA's SOHO mission. [Read the Full Story on Comet ISON's Apparent Survival Here]

Comet ISON Survives Sun Flyby

ESA/NASA/SOHO/GSFC

Comet ISON appears as a white smear heading up and away from the sun in this SOHO spacecraft view taken on Nov. 28, 2013 after the comet's close solar passage. The comet appears to have survived the fiery flyby, NASA scientists say. [Read the Full Story on Comet ISON's Apparent Survival Here]

Comet ISON Survives Sun Flyby?

ESA/NASA/SOHO/Jhelioviewer

Another view from SOHO's C2 chronograph shows Comet ISON appearing bright as it streams toward the sun (right). it can be seen as a dim streak heading upward and out in the left image. The comet may still be intact. Image released Nov. 29, 2013. [Read the Full Story on Comet ISON's Apparent Survival Here]

Comet ISON December Sky Map

NASA

This NASA graphic shows the possible location of Comet ISON in the December night sky if the comet has survived its close sun encounter enough to be visible to the naked eye.[Read the Full Story on Comet ISON's Apparent Survival Here]

Comet ISON by Waldemar Skorupa

Waldemar Skorupa (Kahler Asten, Germany)

German amateur astronomer Waldemar Skorupa captured this spectacular photo of Comet ISON from Kahler Asten, in Germany, on Nov. 16, 2013. [See SPACE.com's Comet ISON Complete Coverage]

Comet ISON Spotted From Space Station

NASA

A close inspection of this image, photographed by one of the Expedition 38 crew members aboard the International Space Station, reveals a pin-head sized view of an object which is actually the comet ISON, seen just to the right of center and a little below center in the frame. Hardware components of the orbital outpost and Earth's atmosphere above the horizon take up most of the image. Most of the other bright dots in the sky are heavenly bodies. The comet is distinguishable by its tail. Image released Nov. 23, 2013.

Comet ISON Near Sun

NASA/SOHO/ESA

This image shows Comet ISON extremely close to the sun as seen by the SOHO spacecraft on Nov. 28, 2013 during the comet's Thanksgiving Day close solar encounter. The comet's long tail is seen sweeping back away from the sun. [Read the Full Story on Comet ISON's Apparent Survival Here]

Comet ISON on Nov. 27, 2013

NASA/SOHO

This view of Comet ISON was captured by the SOHO space observatory on Nov. 27, 2013, one day ahead of the comet's closest approach to the sun. How to Watch Comet ISON via SOHO Observatory

Comet ISON in SOHO on Nov. 28, 2013

ESA&NASA/SOHO/SDO

Comet ISON at 10:51 a.m. EST Comet ISON has moved quite close to the sun in this image from ESA/NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory captured at 10:51 a.m. EST on Nov. 28, 2013. This image is a composite, with the sun imaged by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory in the center, and SOHO showing the solar atmosphere, the corona.

Comet ISON on Nov. 28, 2013: 9:30 am

ESA&NASA/SOHO/SDO

Comet ISON moves ever closer to the sun in this image from ESA and NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO, captured at 9:30 a.m. EST on Nov. 28, 2013. This image is a composite with the sun imaged by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, in the center, and SOHO showing the solar atmosphere, the corona.

Sunward Bound Comet ISON

John Nassr

This stunning portrait of Comet ISON, officially designated as C/2012 S1, was captured by John Nassr on Nov. 15 from his Stardust Observatory in Baguio City in the Philippines. Nassr used a Nikon D7000 digital SLR camera coupled to his custom-built 16-inch f/4.5 Newtonian reflector to record the sungrazing comet’s intricate tail. The image is a combination of five 1-minute-long exposures at ISO 6400.

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: community@space.com.