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Photos of Comet ISON: A Potentially Great Comet

Comet ISON Photographed by Adam Block

Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona

Adam Block of the Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter (University of Arizona), sent in another image of Comet Ison, taken Nov. 8, 2013. He writes in an e-mail message to SPACE.com: "This is exactly one month after the previous picture I captured. It is now significantly brighter (unfortunately not yet visible to unaided eyeballs). However, it is also moving much more quickly so that capturing it at this image scale is a bit tricky. Very soon it will head into the glare of the sun. Hopefully we can monitor it via images from space-based solar telescopes as it rounds the sun at the end of the month."

Eight Spacecraft's Observations of Comet ISON

[clockwise from top-center]: NASA Spitzer, NASA Deep Impact/EPOXI, NASA Hubble, NASA STEREO-B, NASA Mars Reconnaisance Orbiter, ESA/NASA Solar and Helisopheric Observatory, NASA SWIFT, NASA STEREO-A

The Comet ISON Observing Campaign is both terrestrial and celestial. Shown here are observations from the eight different NASA and ESA spacecraft that have observed comet ISON so far.

Comet ISON Streaks through Leo Constellation

NASA/MSFC/Aaron Kingery

In the early morning of Oct. 25, 2013, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., used a 14" telescope to capture this image of Comet ISON (the greenish object just left of center) cruising through the constellation of Leo the Lion, some 132 million miles from Earth and heading in toward the sun at 87,900 miles per hour. [Read the Story Behind the Photo Here]

Comet ISON by Scott Ferguson

Scott Ferguson

Scott Ferguson captured this image of Comet ISON on Oct. 27 while at a friend's private observatory, Northwest Florida Observatory. He used a 20" Meade LX400-ACF Max Mount and Televue NP101 to capture the photo, which was sent to SPACE.com on Oct. 30. [Read the Story Behind the Photo Here]

Hubble Photo of Comet ISON from Oct. 9, 2013

NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took this photo of Comet ISON on Oct. 9, 2013, when the comet was inside Mars’ orbit and about 177 million miles from Earth. The nucleus of ISON appears to be intact. [Read the Full Story Behind the Photo here

True Color Image of Comet iSON

Bruce Gary

Bruce Gary of Hereford, Arizona obtained this a true color image of Comet ISON on Oct. 22, 2013, showing a greenish coma and reddish tail. The coma is now greener than the tail, which is also a result of the recent emission of gas to the coma. The coma is growing in size, as well as brightness. The tail will be slower to undergo change because it takes time for gas and dust in the coma to be swept into the tail. [Read the Story Behind the Photo Here]

Comet ISON Nucleus on Oct. 9

John Chumack | www.galacticimages.com

John Chumack sent SPACE.com this photo of comet ISON’s nucleus taken on the morning of Oct. 9 from his dark-sky site at John Bryan State Park in Yellow Springs, Ohio. “I’m excited to see what comet ISON will do in the next 60 days,” he wrote SPACE.com in an email. He used a QHY8 cooled single shot color CCD camera and his homemade 16" Diameter F4.5 Newt. Telescope to take the image.[Read the Full Story Behind this Photo Here]

Comet ISON Negative on Oct. 9

John Chumack | www.galacticimages.com

John Chumack sent SPACE.com this photo negative of comet ISON taken on the morning of Oct. 9 from his dark-sky site at John Bryan State Park in Yellow Springs, Ohio. “I will be imaging the comet every clear night I get through Perihelion Passage, on Nov. 28, and throughout December and January,” he wrote SPACE.com in an email. He used a QHY8 cooled single shot color CCD camera and his homemade 16" Diameter F4.5 Newt. Telescope to take the photo. [Read the Full Story Behind this Photo Here]

Comet ISON on Oct. 11

Clifford Spohn and Terry Hancock

Clifford Spohn captured this image of comet ISON using a QHY9 mono CCD/TEC 140 F7 Refractor on Oct. 11 from of Marion, Ohio while his good friend astrophotographer Terry Hancock calibrated, stacked in CCDStack and post processed the shot in CS5.

Comet ISON Viewed From John Bryan State Park

John Chumack | www.galacticimages.com

John Chumack sent SPACE.com this photo of comet ISON taken on the morning of Oct. 9 from his dark-sky site at John Bryan State Park in Yellow Springs, Ohio. “I’m excited to see what comet ISON will do in the next 60 days,” he wrote SPACE.com in an email. He used a QHY8 cooled single shot color CCD camera and his homemade 16" Diameter F4.5 Newt. Telescope to take the image.[Read the Full Story Behind this Photo Here]

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