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Transit of Venus 2012 in Pictures (Gallery)

Against The Hellfire

NASA / SDO

The Solar Dynamics Observatory's AIA 304 camera delivered this amazing image of Venus over the active Sun during the first few hours of the Venus Transit.

SDO's Ultra-high Definition View of 2012 Venus Transit - HMI Instrument

NASA/SDO, HMI

On June 5-6 2012, SDO is collecting images of one of the rarest predictable solar events: the transit of Venus across the face of the sun. This event happens in pairs eight years apart that are separated from each other by 105 or 121 years. The last transit was in 2004 and the next will not happen until 2117. This image was captured June 5, 2012.

SDO's Ultra-high Definition View of 2012 Venus Transit - 304 Angstrom

NASA/SDO, AIA

On June 5-6 2012, SDO is collecting images of one of the rarest predictable solar events: the transit of Venus across the face of the sun. This event happens in pairs eight years apart that are separated from each other by 105 or 121 years. The last transit was in 2004 and the next will not happen until 2117. This image was captured June 5, 2012.

SDO's Ultra-high Definition View of 2012 Venus Transit - 171 Angstrom

NASA/SDO, AIA

On June 5-6 2012, SDO is collecting images of one of the rarest predictable solar events: the transit of Venus across the face of the sun. This event happens in pairs eight years apart that are separated from each other by 105 or 121 years. The last transit was in 2004 and the next will not happen until 2117. This image was captured June 5, 2012.

SDO's Ultra-high Definition View of 2012 Venus Transit - 171 Angstrom

NASA/SDO, AIA

On June 5-6 2012, SDO is collecting images of one of the rarest predictable solar events: the transit of Venus across the face of the sun. This event happens in pairs eight years apart that are separated from each other by 105 or 121 years. The last transit was in 2004 and the next will not happen until 2117. This image was captured June 5, 2012.

SDO's Ultra-high Definition View of 2012 Venus Transit - 171 Angstrom

NASA/SDO, AIA

On June 5-6 2012, SDO is collecting images of one of the rarest predictable solar events: the transit of Venus across the face of the sun. This event happens in pairs eight years apart that are separated from each other by 105 or 121 years. The last transit was in 2004 and the next will not happen until 2117. This image was captured June 5, 2012.

SDO's Ultra-high Definition View of 2012 Venus Transit - 304 Angstrom

NASA/SDO/AIA

On June 5-6 2012, SDO is collecting images of one of the rarest predictable solar events: the transit of Venus across the face of the sun. This event happens in pairs eight years apart that are separated from each other by 105 or 121 years. The last transit was in 2004 and the next will not happen until 2117. This image was captured June 5, 2012.

SDO's Ultra-high Definition View of 2012 Venus Transit - 304 Angstrom

NASA/SDO/AIA

On June 5-6 2012, SDO is collecting images of one of the rarest predictable solar events: the transit of Venus across the face of the sun. This event happens in pairs eight years apart that are separated from each other by 105 or 121 years. The last transit was in 2004 and the next will not happen until 2117. This image was captured June 5, 2012.

Venus Transit Viewing at NASA Goddard

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Bill Hrybyk

The Goddard Visitor Center hosted a Venus Transit watch party on June 5, 2012, that included near real-time images from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, coverage of the event from several locations via NASA TV, in-person presentations by NASA experts, hands-on activities for children of all ages. Heavy cloud cover did not allow viewing opportunities of the transit via solar telescopes.

2012 Venus Transit Seen by Solar Dynamics Observatory

NASA/SDO

This series of photographs of the 2012 Venus transit was seen by the Solar Dynamics Observatory in space, June 5, 2012.

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Space.com Staff
Space.com Staff

Space.com is the premier source of space exploration, innovation and astronomy news, chronicling (and celebrating) humanity's ongoing expansion across the final frontier. Originally founded in 1999, Space.com is, and always has been, the passion of writers and editors who are space fans and also trained journalists. Our current news team consists of Editor-in-Chief Tariq Malik; Editor Hanneke Weitering, Senior Space Writer Mike Wall; Senior Writer Meghan Bartels; Senior Writer Chelsea Gohd, Senior Writer Tereza Pultarova and Staff Writer Alexander Cox, focusing on e-commerce. Senior Producer Steve Spaleta oversees our space videos, with Diana Whitcroft as our Social Media Editor.