Space calendar 2023: Rocket launches, skywatching events, missions & more!

Graphic illustration with "space calendar" in large blue neon letters and 2023 below it in smaller white letters. Below the title are four neon images depicting a meteor or comet, a telescope, a rocket launch and an astronaut's helmet. There is a starry background to the entire image.
Keep up to date with the latest space events with our space calendar. (Image credit: Neon images: Zeybart via Getty Images. Image assembled with Canva by Daisy Dobrijevic)

2023 is a busy year for spaceflight and exploration enthusiasts with countless launches, mission milestones and skywatching events to look forward to. 

With so much going on, it's hard to keep track of everything. Never fear — keep up with the latest events in our 2023 space calendar. You can also Find out what's up in the night sky this month with our visible planets guide and skywatching forecast

Please note: Launch dates are subject to change and will be updated throughout the year as firmer dates arise. Please DO NOT schedule travel based on a date you see here. Launch dates are collected from NASA events, ESA news, Roscosmos space launch schedule, Spaceflight Now launch schedule and others.

Related: Wondering what happened today in space history? Check out our "On This Day in Space" video!

January

Jan. 31:  A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch another batch of Starlink satellites from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 3:32 a.m. EST (0832 GMT). You can watch the launch live on our homepage or here in our preview story.

February

Feb. 2: Comet C/2022 E3 (ZTF) will pass within 26 million miles (42 million km) of Earth. If visible, it will climb progressively higher during the early evening hours in the north-northeast sky, passing within 10 degrees of Polaris, the North Star, on Jan. 30 and within 1.5 degrees of the brilliant winter star Capella on Feb. 5. 

Feb. 5: The full moon of February, known as the Snow Moon, arrives at 1:29 p.m. EST (1829 GMT)

Feb. 5: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Amazonas Nexus communications satellite for Hispasat from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida. 

Feb. 9: A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the 83rd Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station.

Feb. 11/12: A Japanese H3 rocket will launch on its first test flight with the Advanced Land Observing Satellite 3, or ALOS 3, an Earth observation satellite for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).  The launch is scheduled to take place from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan with the launch window commencing at 8:37 p.m. EST (Feb. 11), 0137 GMT (Feb. 12).

Feb. 19/20: Russia's space agency will launch an empty Soyuz capsule to the International Space Station in February to replace a damaged spacecraft that is unsafe to return its crew of three to Earth. The launch is scheduled for 8:57 p.m. EST (Feb. 19), 0157 GMT (Feb. 20). 

Feb. 20: The new moon arrives at 2:06 a.m. EST (0706 GMT).

Feb. 26: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program's ninth flight with astronauts. The Crew 6 mission will include NASA astronauts Stephen Bowen, Warren "Woody" Hoburg, UAE astronaut Sultan Al Neyadi, and Russian cosmonaut Andrey Fedyaev will launch on the Crew Dragon spacecraft to begin a six-month expedition on the International Space Station. The launch is scheduled for 2:07 a.m. EST (0707 GMT) from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. 

Also scheduled to launch in February (from Spaceflight Now (opens in new tab)):

  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Inmarsat 6 F2 communications satellite for London-based Inmarsat from Cape Canaveral, Florida.  
  • An Ariane 5 ECA rocket, designated VA259, will launch the Syracuse 4B and Heinrich Hertz communications satellites from Kourou, French Guiana. 
  • Late Feb: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the second pair of O3b mPOWER broadband internet satellites for SES of Luxembourg from Cape Canaveral, Florida. 

March

March 1: Jupiter meets Venus in conjunction. The pair will shine just a moon-width apart in the west-southwest sky, half an hour after sunset.  

March 7: The full moon of March, known as the Worm Moon, arrives at 7:40 a.m. EST (1240 GMT).

March 7: A SpaceX Falcon 9 will launch the Intelsat 40e communications satellite for Intelsat from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida.

March 11: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Dragon 2 spacecraft on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station

March 21: The new moon will arrive at 1:23 p.m. EDT(1823 GMT).

Also scheduled to launch in March (from Spaceflight Now (opens in new tab)):

  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Polaris Dawn mission commanded by Jared Isaacman. It will be his second trip to space. Isaacman will be joined by pilot Scott "Kidd" Poteet, and SpaceX employees Sarah Gillis and Anna Menon. 
  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch around 10 Tranche 0 demonstration satellites for the U.S. military's Space Development Agency from Vandenberg Space Force Base, California. 
  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the IM-1 mission with the Nova-C lander built and owned by Intuitive Machines from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.  
  • A United Launch Alliance Delta 4-Heavy rocket will launch a classified spy satellite cargo for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office.  
  • A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch a new-generation Boeing-built broadband satellite ViaSat 3 Americas.  
  • Late March: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the third pair of O3b mPOWER broadband internet satellites for SES of Luxembourg from Cape Canaveral, Florida. 

April

Apr. 5: Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket to launch the European Space Agency's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer mission, known as JUICE. The mission will observe Jupiter along with its three large moons Ganymede, Callisto and Europa. The spacecraft will enter orbit of the Jovian system in July 2031. 

Apr. 6: The full moon of April, known as the Pink Moon, will arrive at 12:34 a.m. EDT (0534 GMT).

Apr. 20: The new moon will arrive at 12:12 a.m. EDT (0512 GMT).

Apr. 20: A rare hybrid solar eclipse will occur today. The solar eclipse will be visible to observers across southeast Asia and Australia. 

Related: Solar eclipses 2023: When, where & how to see them

Apr. 22: The Lyrid meteor shower peaks tonight! The shower is active between Apr. 16 and Apr. 25 each year. 

Also scheduled to launch in April (from Spaceflight Now (opens in new tab)):

  • A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on its first crewed flight. NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Mike Fincke, along with an unidentified third crew member, will fly on the mission. The Crew Test Flight to the International Space Station will lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida. 
  • A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket will launch a Cygnus cargo freighter on a flight to the International Space Station
  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Transporter 7 mission from either Vandenberg Space Force Base, California or Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Florida. The rideshare mission will take several small microsatellites and nanosatellites into sun-synchronous orbit. 

May

May 5: The full moon of May, known as the Flower Moon, will arrive at 1:34 p.m. EDT (1834 GMT).

May 5: A penumbral lunar eclipse will occur today! Some parts of the lunar eclipse should be visible in South/East Europe, Much of Asia, Australia, Africa, Pacific, Atlantic, the Indian Ocean and Antarctica.

Related: Lunar eclipses 2023: When, where & how to see them

May 5: The Eta Aquarid meteor shower peaks tonight! The shower is active between Apr. 15 and May 27 each year. 

May 19: The new moon will arrive at 11:53 a.m. EDT (1653 GMT).

Also scheduled to launch in May (from Spaceflight Now (opens in new tab)): 

  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Crew Dragon spacecraft on Axiom Mission 2 to the International Space Station. The commercial mission will include former NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson in command, and John Shoffner (a racecar driver and airshow pilot), who paid for his seat as the pilot. They will be joined by two Saudi astronauts.  
  • A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the 84th Progress cargo delivery ship to the International Space Station.

June

June 3: The full moon of June, known as the Strawberry Moon, will arrive at 11:42 p.m. EDT (0442 GMT on June 4).

June 4: Venus reaches its greatest elongation — its greatest angular distance — 45 degrees to the east of the sun. 

June 18: The new moon will arrive at 12:37 a.m. EDT (0537 GMT).

June 21: Today marks the summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere and the winter solstice for the Southern Hemisphere. 

Also scheduled to launch in June (from Spaceflight Now): 

July

July 3: The full moon of July, known as the Buck Moon, will arrive at 7:39 a.m. EDT (1239 GMT). 

July 17: The new moon will arrive at 2:32 p.m. EDT (1932 GMT). 

August

Aug. 1: The full moon of August, known as the Sturgeon Moon, will arrive at 2:32 p.m. EDT (1932 GMT). 

Aug. 11: The Perseid meteor shower peaks tonight! The prolific shower is active from mid-July until late August. 

Aug. 16: The new moon will arrive at 5:38 a.m. EDT (1038 GMT).

Aug. 24: The moon will pass in front of one of the brightest and most colorful stars in the sky, Antares.

Aug. 30: The second full moon in August is known as the Blue Moon as it's the second full moon in a calendar moon. It will arrive at 9:36 p.m. EDT (0236 GMT Aug 31). 

Also scheduled to launch in August (from Spaceflight Now): 

  • A SpaceX Falcon 9 will launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on the program's 12th crewed flight. 

September

Sept 14: The new moon will arrive at 9:40 p.m. EDT (0240 GMT on Sept. 15).

Sept. 29: The full moon of September, known as the Harvest Moon, will occur at 5:58 a.m. EDT (1058 GMT).

October

Oct. 8: The Draconid meteor shower peaks tonight! The shower is active between Oct. 6 and Oct. 10.

Oct. 14: The new moon will arrive at 1:55 p.m. EDT (1855 GMT).

Oct. 14: An annular solar eclipse will cross North, Central and South America today! 

Related: Solar eclipses 2023: When, where & how to see them

Oct. 20: The Orionid meteor shower peaks tonight! The shower is active between Sept. 26 and Nov. 22. 

Oct. 28: The full moon of October, known as the Hunter's Moon, will occur at 4:24 p.m. EDT (2124 GMT).

Oct. 28: A partial lunar eclipse will occur today! Some parts of the partial lunar eclipse should be visible over Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, North America, North/East South America, the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans, the Arctic and Antarctica.

Related: Lunar eclipses 2023: When, where & how to see them

November

Nov. 4: The Southern Taurid meteor shower peaks tonight! The shower is active between Sept. 28 and Dec. 2. 

Nov. 9: At 5 a.m. local time, make sure to look toward the east-northeast sky to see the most spectacular pairing of the moon and Venus of 2023. 

Nov. 11: The Northern Taurid meteor shower peaks tonight! The shower is active between Oct. 13 and Dec. 2. 

Nov. 13: The new moon will arrive at 4:27 a.m. EST (0927 GMT).

Nov. 17: The Leonid meteor shower peaks tonight! The shower is active between Nov. 3 and Dec. 2.

Nov. 27: The full moon of November, known as the Beaver Moon, will arrive at 4:16 a.m. EST (0916 GMT)

December

Dec. 12: The new moon will arrive at 6:32 p.m. EST (2332 GMT).

Dec. 14: The Geminid meteor shower peaks tonight! The shower is active between Dec. 4 and Dec. 17.

Dec 21: Today is the winter solstice for the Northern Hemisphere and the summer solstice for the Southern Hemisphere.

Dec: 21: The Ursid meteor shower peaks tonight! The shower is active from Dec. 13 to Dec. 24.

Dec. 26: The full moon of December, known as the Cold Moon, will occur at 7:33 p.m. EST (0033 GMT on Dec. 27). 

More in 2023

Early 2023: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the SES 18 and SES 19 communications satellites for SES of Luxembourg from Cape Canaveral, Florida. They will provide C-band television and data service over the U.S. 

Early 2023: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the first two WorldView Legion Earth observation satellites for Maxar Technologies. It will lift off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. 

Early 2023: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the second pair of WorldView Legion Earth observation satellites for Maxar Technologies. 

1st Quarter: A United Launch Alliance Vulcan Centaur rocket will launch on its inaugural flight with the Peregrine commercial lunar lander for Astrobotic. It will lift off from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

2nd Quarter: A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the USSF 52 mission for the U.S. Space Force. It will lift off from Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

2nd Quarter: A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the USSF 51 mission for the U.S. Space Force. 

Summer: A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-100, will launch the ViaSat 3 EMEA broadband communications satellite from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. 

3rd Quarter: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Euclid mission for the European Space Agency (ESA). Euclid aims to learn more about the parts of the universe we can't see — specifically, dark energy and dark matter.

TBD: India's Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) will launch its first commercial mission with four Earth observation satellites for BlackSky Global. It will lift off from the Satish Dhawan Space Center in Sriharikota, India. 

TBD: SpaceX's first Starship Orbital Test Flight could launch from Starbase, Boca Chica Beach, Texas to orbit the Earth and splashdown off the coast of Hawaii. 

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Daisy Dobrijevic
Reference Writer

Daisy Dobrijevic joined Space.com in February 2022 as a reference writer having previously worked for our sister publication All About Space magazine as a staff writer. Before joining us, Daisy completed an editorial internship with the BBC Sky at Night Magazine and worked at the National Space Centre in Leicester, U.K., where she enjoyed communicating space science to the public. In 2021, Daisy completed a PhD in plant physiology and also holds a Master's in Environmental Science, she is currently based in Nottingham, U.K.

  • Christmom3
    Admin said:
    Here's a LhZJPyDGPmMNxwDMmG4D8Se to SpaceX's launch schedule, other rocket missions, astronomical events of the next year, as well as milestones for spacecraft already in travel.

    Space Launch Calendar 2019: Sky Events, Missions & More : Read more
    May you please post a link to the 2020 space launch calendar? Thanks so much
    Reply
  • Wolfshadw
    Christmom3 said:
    May you please post a link to the 2020 space launch calendar? Thanks so much

    The article was updated on 7-31-20 to list upcoming events through the end of 2020.

    -Wolf sends
    Reply
  • EdnRno
    first time at your site - Great!
    You might check your Jan 2 comment "perihelion" - pretty sure it's "closest" to the sun. My mnemonic was always "pretty close"/ counterintuitive for during our "winter" . Thanks.

    "Jan. 2: Happy perihelion day! Earth is farthest from the sun today. "
    Reply
  • rel
    Need clarification of time zones....
    In the calendar on Jan 6 states "10:10 a.m. EST (1410 GMT)."
    10:10am EST is NOT 1410GMT! This needs to be corrected

    Likewise Jan 11th 9:25 a.m. EST (1325 GMT) also needs to be corrected.
    Reply
  • badhack
    Is this 2021 calendar available as a google calendar (or even a cal file)? NYTimes has one but this one is so much more complete. That would be super cool!
    Reply
  • yohandz007
    badhack said:
    Is this 2021 calendar available as a google calendar (or even a cal file)? NYTimes has one but this one is so much more complete. That would be super cool!
    https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0?cid=N2J0bXBwZ205czFvN25nb2Y4bzh1OW9zZmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQSince there is no calendar, I made one for my self on Google Calendar. You can use it too. I have not completed it yet, but I will in a few days.
    Reply
  • badhack
    yohandz007 said:
    https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0?cid=N2J0bXBwZ205czFvN25nb2Y4bzh1OW9zZmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQSince there is no calendar, I made one for my self on Google Calendar. You can use it too. I have not completed it yet, but I will in a few days.

    Awesome thank you very much yohandz007. btw your calendar is not public but I sent a request.
    Reply
  • Marin Tomuta
    Equinox is the mid-day of spring ppl! Equinox is in the middle at the equator, therefore it is the middle of spring. Isn't it?
    Am I the only on who thinks the equinox is mid-Spring/mid-Autumn and not the first day of? I mean its kind of a bit of a difference. Its the 1st day of the Sun shining at 90° at the equator and soon to be in northern hemisphere.
    Otherwise how would the summer solstice, being the longest day of the year not be the middle of summer? Summer begins when daylight starts to wane? No. It begins 1.5 moons before the solstice/equinox. 1st day of spring was 03Feb. I confirmed it by noticing plants flowering!
    Reply
  • Marin Tomuta
    Marin Tomuta said:
    Equinox is the mid-day of spring ppl! Equinox is in the middle at the equator, therefore it is the middle of spring. Isn't it?
    Am I the only on who thinks the equinox is mid-Spring/mid-Autumn and not the first day of? I mean its kind of a bit of a difference. Its the 1st day of the Sun shining at 90° at the equator and soon to be in northern hemisphere.
    Otherwise how would the summer solstice, being the longest day of the year not be the middle of summer? Summer begins when daylight starts to wane? No. It begins 1.5 moons before the solstice/equinox. 1st day of spring was 03Feb. I confirmed it by noticing plants flowering!
    I am at 33.8°N 118°W. Thats why flowers bloomed so early.
    On Northern Vernal Equinox Day, if one is at the North Pole, it is the 1st day of Spring; but if one is at the equator its the middle of Summer. Wherever the dynamic equator is, there its the midSummer. So when its the Northern Summer Solstice, its midSummer at the tropic of Cancer all the way up to the North Pole. I'm thinking the July/August heatwave is just that as the climate/solar wind folds onto itself as the dynamic equator moves South, as Earth reaches Aphelion.

    So, it all depends where one is located on Earth in relation to the Sun that determines actual 1st days of seasons.
    Hardly anyone lives at the North Pole. Not even Santa, I think. Most diverse biota are located within the tropics.
    Plz, no development within the Tropics! Plz, keep it natural. Thank you. 🙏
    Reply
  • darrenwebster
    yohandz007 said:
    https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0?cid=N2J0bXBwZ205czFvN25nb2Y4bzh1OW9zZmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQSince there is no calendar, I made one for my self on Google Calendar. You can use it too. I have not completed it yet, but I will in a few days.


    yohandz007 said:
    https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0?cid=N2J0bXBwZ205czFvN25nb2Y4bzh1OW9zZmNAZ3JvdXAuY2FsZW5kYXIuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbQSince there is no calendar, I made one for my self on Google Calendar. You can use it too. I have not completed it yet, but I will in a few days.

    Hey, I hope you’re well. Is the calendar still available? I tried adding the calendar using the url and it says it doesn’t exist.
    Reply