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Stellina Smart Telescope Makes Astrophotography a Breeze: Review

The Stellina smart telescope is a fully automated tabletop telescope that makes astrophotography a breeze.
The Stellina smart telescope is a fully automated tabletop telescope that makes astrophotography a breeze. (Image credit: Vaonis)

A swanky new telescope offers a whole new way to observe the cosmos. With automated controls and a smartphone app instead of an eyepiece, the Stellina smart telescope takes all the hassle out of skywatching — but it comes at a hefty price. 

Stellina is a fully automated astrophotography telescope about the size of a backpack. You can quickly and easily set it up anywhere, even in places with copious amounts of light pollution, like New York City. I took Stellina out for a spin, first on my rooftop in Brooklyn, New York, and then in a darker area outside of the city. I was impressed with Stellina's ability to capture decent photos of deep-space objects despite the light pollution in Brooklyn. And thanks to the telescope's portable size and simple setup, the Stellina was easy to pick up and bring along for an adventure in the wilderness outside the city.

Using Stellina requires virtually no knowledge of astronomy or how to use a telescope. All you need is a smartphone and a little patience, and you can capture stunning images of galaxies, nebulas and star clusters. When you turn this telescope on, it automatically aligns itself by looking around the sky and identifying objects in the star field. Once the initialization is complete, you simply select an object from the catalog in the Stellina app on your phone; then, kick back and relax while Stellina does all the rest of the work for you. Astrophotography doesn't get any simpler than this. However, Stellina does have some limitations that may not be ideal for professional astrophotographers, and at a price of $3,999, it's a pretty big investment for the casual stargazer.

Related: Best Telescopes for the Money - 2019 Reviews and Guide

Using the Stellina telescope on a rooftop in Brooklyn, New York, I was able to capture a surprisingly clear image of the Andromeda galaxy. The telescope is equipped with a light-pollution filter, which is ideal for city dwellers. However, you should still get away from city lights to capture higher-quality images. This image combines 158 exposures captured over the course of 26 minutes. (Image credit: Hanneke Weitering/Space.com)

The telescope has a fixed focal length of 15.75 inches (400 millimeters), which makes it well-suited for observing objects outside of the solar system, but it doesn't work as well for observing planets. If you try to photograph a planet using Stellina, the resulting image will be quite small, though the resolution is good enough to make out the cloud bands of Jupiter. 

To my surprise, I was able to get a pretty decent image of the Andromeda galaxy from my light-polluted home in Brooklyn. Although Andromeda looks more like an oblong smudge than a spiral galaxy in my image, you can still see some semblance of the galaxy's spiral arms. (For comparison, below is a video of the Andromeda galaxy as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope.) It took about half an hour of observation time for Stellina to get this image, which contains 158 stacked exposures. Because Stellina automatically moves along with the Earth's rotation, I didn't have to manually adjust the telescope's position to track Andromeda's motion across the night sky. 

That same night, I also made an image of Caldwell 14, also known as the Double Cluster in Perseus, which contains the open star clusters NGC 869 and NGC 884. The Stellina app recommended a 10-minute exposure for Caldwell 14, but I cut the observation short when I noticed that one of the two clusters was partially outside the frame. At the time of this review, there was no way to manually "steer" the telescope to adjust the frame. 

However, Vaonis (the company that makes Stellina) has since told Space.com in an email that due to software updates, users can now adjust the frame the way they want. Users will also be able to make sure of the mosaic feature that will be available by the end of the year (2021).

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My first attempt at photographing Caldwell 14, also known as the Double Cluster, which contains the open star clusters NGC 869 and NGC 884: The Double Cluster is about 7,500 light-years away from Earth, in the constellation Perseus, and it is visible to the naked eye. Here, one of the clusters (NGC 884) was clipped on the edge of the frame. The makers of Stellina were able to correct this alignment issue with a software update, and you can see the result in the following image.

My first attempt at photographing Caldwell 14, also known as the Double Cluster, which contains the open star clusters NGC 869 and NGC 884: The Double Cluster is about 7,500 light-years away from Earth, in the constellation Perseus, and it is visible to the naked eye. Here, one of the clusters (NGC 884) was clipped on the edge of the frame. The makers of Stellina were able to correct this alignment issue with a software update, and you can see the result in the following image. (Image credit: Hanneke Weitering/Space.com)
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To fix Stellina's alignment issues while imaging the Double Cluster in Perseus, Vaonis issued a software update for its Stellina app that rotated the image by about 45 degrees, putting both star clusters almost entirely in the frame. This image is a combination of 30 exposures captured over the course of 5 minutes, which is only half the observation time recommended by the Stellina app.

To fix Stellina's alignment issues while imaging the Double Cluster in Perseus, Vaonis issued a software update for its Stellina app that rotated the image by about 45 degrees, putting both star clusters almost entirely in the frame. This image is a combination of 30 exposures captured over the course of 5 minutes, which is only half the observation time recommended by the Stellina app. (Image credit: Hanneke Weitering/Space.com)

After updating the Stellina app on my phone, I drove the telescope out to a darker area about 70 miles (110 kilometers) west of New York City to see what the instrument could do without the light pollution — and to take another stab at the image of Caldwell 14. 

My second image of the double cluster, this time only a 5-minute exposure, looked a lot like the first one, but it was rotated by about 45 degrees to get the previously cropped cluster into the frame. I had to cut this observation short, too, because Stellina was having some difficulty with the temperature change and humidity and the app was displaying error messages. (You can compare both images in the slider above.)

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Messier 13, also known as the Hercules Cluster, is a globular star cluster located about 22,200 light-years away from Earth, in the Hercules constellation. I captured this image with Stellina from a darker area about 70 miles (110 kilometers) west of New York City. This image combines 64 exposures captured over the course of 11 minutes. (The Stellina app recommends 15 minutes of observation time to image this object.)

Messier 13, also known as the Hercules Cluster, is a globular star cluster located about 22,200 light-years away from Earth, in the Hercules constellation. I captured this image with Stellina from a darker area about 70 miles (110 kilometers) west of New York City. This image combines 64 exposures captured over the course of 11 minutes. (The Stellina app recommends 15 minutes of observation time to image this object.) (Image credit: Hanneke Weitering/Space.com)
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A Stellina image of Messier 45, also known as the Pleiades star cluster, shows only four of the seven bright stars that gave the cluster its nickname, the Seven Sisters. This is due to the telescope's field of view, but future updates to the Stellina app will allow users to create mosaics as a workaround.

A Stellina image of Messier 45, also known as the Pleiades star cluster, shows only four of the seven bright stars that gave the cluster its nickname, the Seven Sisters. This is due to the telescope's field of view, but future updates to the Stellina app will allow users to create mosaics as a workaround. (Image credit: Hanneke Weitering/Space.com)

Before Stellina gave in for the night, I was able to capture two other deep-space images, one of the Hercules star cluster and one of the Pleiades star cluster, also known as the Seven Sisters. Those images turned out pretty, but I ran into the same framing issues as I did with the double cluster when observing the Pleiades; only four of the seven bright stars for which the cluster is named are visible in my image.

Such issues should now be addressed with the recent software updates where users can adjust the frame the way they want, according to Vaonis.

When Stellina is working on an observation, it can take over an hour to complete the recommended observing time, depending on the object. As with most skywatching endeavors, astrophotography with Stellina requires a bit of patience. However, the Stellina app has some features to keep you occupied and entertained while you wait for your image. 

As the telescope captures multiple short exposures, it stacks them all into one image, and you can watch the stacking happen in real time. You can also scroll through all the individual exposures and see how the final product improves with each newly stacked image. 

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Orion Nebula (M42) captured by Stellina

Orion Nebula (M42) captured by Stellina with 267 stacked images each taken with a ten second exposure. (Image credit: Vaonis)
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Eagle nebula (M16) captured by Stellina with 168 stacked images each with ten second exposure.

Eagle nebula (M16) captured by Stellina with 168 stacked images each with ten second exposure. (Image credit: Vaonis)
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The Moon captured by Stellina.

The moon captured by Stellina. (Image credit: Vaonis)

The built-in catalog — which contains more than 250 deep-space objects — is regularly updated with new targets every two to three months. The catalog is also filled with educational content and images to peruse while you wait. 

You can also enter celestial coordinates (RA/Dec coordinates), giving you unlimited access to the sky.

Stellinapp makes it easy to quickly share your space images on social media. (Image credit: Vaonis)

The Stellina app (called Stellinapp) makes it easy to quickly share your space images on social media, but you might have trouble doing that while your phone is connected to the telescope. Stellina connects to your phone via the telescope's own internal Wi-Fi network. In other words, you connect your phone to the telescope in the exact same way that you would connect to a real Wi-Fi network, only Stellina can't give you access to the internet. 

When I connected to the Stellina Wi-Fi network on my Android phone, I was not able to simultaneously use my mobile data connection. I could be connected to only one network at a time. So, if you're trying to kill time while waiting for Stellina to complete an observation, you won't be able to do it by perusing the internet on your phone. 

Vaonis have since told Space.com in an email that simultaneous connection to Stellina and the internet is available for iPhone and is available on some Android devices but not all. 

To learn more about Stellina, check out the telescope's specs and see more deep-space images, visit vaonis.com/stellina. You can order the telescope there for $3,999  and it comes with a two-year warranty. Shipping is free and Stellina is tax-free for any orders placed in the U.S. on vaonis.com.

Email Hanneke Weitering at hweitering@space.com or follow her @hannekescience. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

This article was updated on September 15, 2021 by All About Space staff writer Daisy Dobrijevic

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Hanneke Weitering

Hanneke Weitering is an editor at Space.com with 10 years of experience in science journalism. She has previously written for Scholastic Classroom Magazines, MedPage Today and The Joint Institute for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After studying physics at the University of Tennessee in her hometown of Knoxville, she earned her graduate degree in Science, Health and Environmental Reporting (SHERP) from New York University. Hanneke joined the Space.com team in 2016 as a staff writer and producer, covering topics including spaceflight and astronomy. She currently lives in Seattle, home of the Space Needle, with her cat and two snakes. In her spare time Hanneke likes to explore the Rocky Mountains, basking in nature and looking for dark skies to gaze at the cosmos.