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'Vacation Guide to the Solar System': An Awesome Travel Book in Pictures

'Vacation Guide to the Solar System'
(Image: © Steve Thomas/Random House)

Visiting the Solar System

Steve Thomas/Random House

In "Vacation Guide to the Solar System" (Penguin Books, 2017), authors Olivia Koski and Jana Grcevich bring readers through the finer points of visiting the top solar system destinations, from skiing on Mercury to taking a wheeled submarine down to the surface of Venus. Here are some of Space.com's favorite images from the book, illustrated by Steve Thomas.

Read a Q&A with the book's authors here.

Disposable Clothes

Steve Thomas/Random House

In space, you wear clothing as long as possible but then dispose of it rather than doing laundry. To tour the solar system, you'll be spending a lot of travel time in your space capsule.

Scenic Spots

Steve Thomas/Random House

Visit the moon's vast Tycho Crater.

Challenging Passtime

Steve Thomas/Random House

Baseball on the moon is a fun (and challenging) pastime in the universe of "Vacation Guide to the Solar System."

Day and Night

Steve Thomas/Random House

On Mercury, the terminator line separating night and day is a fascinating location — just don't get caught on the sunny side.

Dangerous Atmosphere

Steve Thomas/Random House

Venus' upper atmosphere is the spot in the solar system with temperature and pressure most like Earth's. It's the perfect place for floating cities, as long as you've prepared for the corrosive clouds.

Limited Access

Steve Thomas/Random House

Venus' surface, on the other hand, is far too hot and high-pressure to visit for long. Probes rarely last long, and exploration would take a very heavy-duty vehicle.

Loose Connection

Steve Thomas/Random House

Mars' moon Phobos is the closer and larger of the Red Planet's two moons, featuring very low gravity and a stunning view of Mars. You have to travel at 25 mph (41 km/h) to reach escape velocity from this moon, though, so don't worry about jumping all the way off.

Easier to Explore

Steve Thomas/Random House

Gravity on Mars is a little more than one-third of Earth's, giving a helpful boost to anyone exploring the Red Planet's striking canyons.

Beauty in the Sky

Steve Thomas/Random House

Look toward Jupiter's north pole for its stunning aurora display.

Cosmic Sea Exploration

Steve Thomas/Random House

Go diving in the intriguing sea below the ice of Jupiter's moon Europa.

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