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The 100 Best Space Photos of 2018!

The Sun Sets Over the Statue of Liberty

Gowrishankar L.

The Statue of Liberty stands tall and proud as the sun sets over the New York Harbor at 4:38 p.m. EST on Jan. 14, 2018, in this photo captured by astrophotographer Gowrishankar L. from Lower Manhattan. [Full Story: Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Setting Sun … ]

Satellite Flare Photobombs a Lunar Eclipse

Miguel Claro

A scene captured from the Portuguese village of Campinho in the Dark Sky Alqueva Reserve shows a partially eclipsed moon, Mars and the Milky Way with a flare from the Formosat-2 satellite crossing the center of the picture. The bright planet Jupiter is also visible on the right edge. [Full Story: Satellite Flare Photobombs a Lunar Eclipse Under the Milky Way (Photo)]

Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner

Alexandru Babiuc

Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner passes by Messier 37 (also known as NGC 2099), an open star cluster in the modern constellation of Auriga, in this image captured by astrophotographer Alex Babiuc on Sept. 11, 2018.

Milky Way over Montauk Point Lighthouse

Chirag Upreti

On the easternmost tip of New York state, the galactic core of the Milky Way offers a beautiful backdrop to the Montauk Point Lighthouse. Astrophotographer Chirag Upreti captured this image of the Milky Way on Feb. 18, 2018, shortly after it became visible from North America for the first time this year.

'Lunar X'

Miguel Claro

A high-resolution mosaic of the first-quarter moon reveals the Lunar "X" surrounded by craters. The image was captured by astrophotographer Miguel Claro at the Cumeada Observatory, the headquarters of the Dark Sky Alqueva Reserve in Portugal. [Full Story: See If You Can Spot the 'Lunar X' in This Close-Up View of the Moon]

The Pelican Nebula

John Chumack/Galactic Images

Astrophotographer John Chumack captured this image of the Pelican Nebula, also known as IC 5070, which lies about 1,800 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus the Swan. The slender dark region in the center of the image is the top of the pelican’s bill.

Two Rocket Stages

Office of the Mayor/Eric Garcetti

The Falcon 9’s first and second stages (right and left, respectively) are clearly visible in this photo by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

A Spring Milky Way

Miguel Claro

A panoramic view captured from the village of Campinho in Portugal's Dark Sky Alqueva Reserve shows the arc of the Milky Way as seen during a spring night in the Northern Hemisphere. The scene also includes Mars, Saturn and Jupiter. [Full Story: Behold, the Milky Way! Our Galaxy Glitters in This Spectacular Photo]

What Goes Up Must Come Down

SpaceX

This photo captures all of the SpaceX action on Oct. 7, 2018: A Falcon 9 rocket launching the SAOCOM-1A satellite from California’s Vandenberg Air Force Station; the plume created by the liftoff; and the Falcon 9’s first stage coming back to land at Vandenberg (short orange arc at right).

Astronaut Sees a 'Glory'

ESA/NASA

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst captured the space station's view of an atmospheric phenomenon called a glory on Sept. 14, 2018.

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Hanneke Weitering

Hanneke Weitering is an editor at Space.com with 10 years of experience in science journalism. She has previously written for Scholastic Classroom Magazines, MedPage Today and The Joint Institute for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After studying physics at the University of Tennessee in her hometown of Knoxville, she earned her graduate degree in Science, Health and Environmental Reporting (SHERP) from New York University. Hanneke joined the Space.com team in 2016 as a staff writer and producer, covering topics including spaceflight and astronomy. She currently lives in Seattle, home of the Space Needle, with her cat and two snakes. In her spare time Hanneke likes to explore the Rocky Mountains, basking in nature and looking for dark skies to gaze at the cosmos.