On Oct. 11, 2018, two astronauts piled into a Russian Soyuz spacecraft for what should have been a routine trip to the International Space Station. But just a few minutes after liftoff, an issue with the Soyuz's rocket — also called Soyuz — triggered an emergency landing, which both crewmembers survived in good condition.

Space.com has been covering the incident and its implications for human space exploration since liftoff. Read our complete coverage below.

First Soyuz Launch Abort Report  | Photos Video

Thursday, Nov. 1

Russians ID Cause of Soyuz Launch Abort, Release Dramatic Rocket Video
A deformed sensor caused the harrowing Soyuz rocket launch abort that forced its American and Russian crew to perform a emergency landing last month, Russia's space agency Roscosmos announced Thursday (Oct. 31).

Friday, Oct. 26

Astronaut to Ride on Next Crewed Soyuz Has Confidence in Russian Space Tech
Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques — who witnessed the aborted launch of Expedition 57 two weeks ago in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, and is next on the list to fly on a Soyuz — says he is more confident than ever in the Russian technology that carries astronauts to the International Space Station.

Tuesday, Oct. 23

Russian Soyuz Rocket Will Launch Astronauts to Space Station by Christmas, NASA Chief Says
The NASA administrator confirmed during a meeting of the U.S. National Space Council that astronauts will be flying aboard the Soyuz as scheduled in December.

Monday, Oct. 22

Roscosmos to Complete Soyuz Accident Investigation This Month
Russian space agency Roscosmos has announced that its investigation into the failed launch will be complete by Oct. 30, although it's not clear whether the results will be available to the public.

Thursday, Oct. 18

After Soyuz Abort, Russia Wants 3 Successful Robotic Flights Before Next Crew Launch
The head of Roscosmos' human spaceflight decision confirmed that at least three robotic Soyuz launches would need to be successful before the agency would again put crewmembers aboard the rocket.

Wednesday, Oct. 17

What It Felt Like to Be Aboard the Failed Rocket Launch to the Space Station
NASA astronaut Nick Hague recounted what was happening inside the Soyuz module as the rocket failed and he and his colleague landed.

Tuesday, Oct. 16

NASA Astronaut Nick Hague 'Rolls with Punches' After Harrowing Soyuz Launch Failure
In his first interviews after the launch failure, NASA astronaut Nick Hague described what it was like to return to family and friends, and what's next for his space station dreams.

Crew of Failed Soyuz Rocket Will Fly Again Next Spring, Russia's Space Chief Says
Dmitry Rogozin, head of the Russian space agency, took to Twitter to assure the public that Hague and his Russian colleague, Alexey Ovchinin, will fly again soon.

Monday, Oct. 15

Chiefs of NASA, Russian Space Agency Pledge Swift Return to Soyuz Launches
NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and Rogozin have each expressed confidence that Soyuz rockets will be able to launch again soon.

Sunday, Oct. 14

Eyewitness Observer of Dramatic Soyuz Launch Abort Describes What He Saw
An eyewitness at the aborted Soyuz launch to the International Space Station Oct. 11 saw an odd smoke trail emerging from the rocket crew members' craft separated to make a daring landing back on Earth. 

Saturday, Oct. 13

Here's How Space Agencies Prepare to Rescue Astronauts During Soyuz Launch Aborts and Landings
When a Soyuz rocket blasted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Oct. 11, everything seemed fine — but just in case it wasn't, search and rescue crews were stationed across the region, ready to jump into action.

Friday, Oct. 12

Here's What the Failed Soyuz Rocket Launch Looked Like to an Astronaut in Space
European astronaut Alexander Gerst captured incredible photographs of the failed launch from its destination.

Russian Rocket's Failure Reminds Us That Spaceflight Is Still Dangerous
While both astronauts escaped the failed launch unscathed, that hasn't always been the case.

Soyuz Investigators Home in on Booster Separation, Promise Conclusions Oct. 20
Hours after the incident, Roscosmos had already launched an investigation into what went wrong.

Safety Panel Fears Soyuz Failure Could Exacerbate Commercial Crew Safety Concerns
The U.S. still lacks its own human-rated launch vehicle.

NASA Astronaut Nick Hague Thanks Rescuers, Supporters After Soyuz Rocket Launch Abort
In his first public statement since the failed launch, the NASA astronaut aboard thanked the quick response to the emergency.

Should We Be Worried About Russian Rockets?
The failed launch of the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft with two space fliers aboard adds a new chapter to an already long story of mishaps and failures besetting the Russian space industry, according to space safety experts.

Thursday, Oct. 11

Here's What Today's Soyuz Launch Failure Means for Space Station Astronauts
Without new crewmembers to welcome, astronauts aboard the space station shuffled their schedule for the day.

In Photos: Space Station Crew's Harrowing Abort Landing After Soyuz Launch Failure
A photo gallery gathers incredible images from the failed launch and its aftermath.

Empty Space Station? NASA Prepares for the Worst (but Hopes for the Best) After Soyuz Abort
With a new crew temporarily unable to reach the International Space Station, the orbiting laboratory may find itself empty.

A Russian Soyuz Rocket Launch Failed, But Its Abort Safety System Saved Lives
The family of rockets has been in use for half a century, and its escape system has been honed over those years as well.

Astronaut, Cosmonaut in 'Good Health' After Surviving Soyuz Rocket Launch Failure
Here's what two crewmembers would have experienced during the emergency ballistic re-entry landing.

NASA Administrator Promises Investigation into Astronauts' Emergency Landing After Soyuz Failure 
In his first statement after the launch failure, the NASA chief expressed gratitude for the astronauts' safe landing.

Soyuz Rocket Launch Failure Forces Emergency Landing for US-Russian Space Station Crew 
Immediate coverage of the launch failure was updated live as NASA and Roscosmos provided new information.

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