Best Night Sky Photos of the Week: Jan. 25, 2014

Lunar Halo Crowns the Moon Over Observatory in Striking Photo

Night sky photographer Scott MacNeill captured this beautiful image of a lunar halo over an observatory in Charlestown, R.I. See the story behind the image here. [See the story behind the image here. ]

Stargazer Snaps Stunning View of Andromeda Galaxy (Photo)

Astrophotographer Jeff Johnson took advantage of some clear night skies and holiday leave to capture this remarkable view of the Andromeda Galaxy from Las Cruces, N.M. [See how he did it. ]

New Supernova spotted in M82 by Adam Block

Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona

Astronomers have discovered a new supernova in the galaxy M82 (the Cigar Galaxy) 12 million light-years from Earth. It is the closest star explosion in more than 20 years. Here: Adam Block sent SPACE.com this photo of the supernova as seen on Jan. 23, 2014. He captured the image from the University of Arizona's Mount Lemmon SkyCenter. [See More Photos]

New Supernova in M82 by Mike Hankey

Mike Hankey sent SPACE.com this image of the new supernova spotted in Messier 82 on Jan. 23, 2014. He captured the photo from Auberry, Calif. using a RCOS 14.5 telescope, Apogee U16M camera, Paramount ME mount, and SBIG 402 with MMOAG Off Axis Guider. [See More Photos]

New Supernova in M82 by Ezequiel Benitez

Ezequiel Benitez

Ezequiel Benitez sent SPACE.com this image of the new supernova in Messier 82 on Jan. 22, 2014. [See More Photos]

Supernova M82

UCL/University of London Observatory/Steve Fossey/Ben Cooke/Guy Pollack/Matthew Wilde/Thomas Wright

This comparison image shows a supernova suddenly appearing in the nearby galaxy M82 on January, 22 2014. [See More Photos]

Starry Night: The Seven Sisters Shine Brilliantly in New Pleiades Photo

Robert Fields | Terry Hancock

Two night sky photographers in Michigan collaborated despite some tough winter weather to capture a beautiful photo of the Pleiades star cluster. [See how they did it.]

The Odd Couple

Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona

At the left, spiral galaxy NGC 2276, in the constellation of Cepheus, shows an asymmetrical appearance. To its right, we see elliptical galaxy NGC 2300, together with NGC 2276 forming galaxy pair Arp 114. Researchers believe that interaction with NGC 2300 does not cause the deformation of NGC 2276. The galaxies float in a preponderance of gas, which may slow NGC 2276’s motion and cause the alteration in its form. Adam Block of the Mount Lemmon SkyCenter at the University of Arizona captured this image in December 2013. [See More Photos]

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