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Vaonis announces Hyperia, its most advanced telescope yet

The new Hyperia telescope from Vaonis.
The new Hyperia telescope from Vaonis. (Image credit: Vaonis)

Following the release of the Stellina telescope in 2018 and the Vespera model less than a year ago, telescope maker Vaonis is launching a brand-new, ultra-powerful scope: Hyperia.

The new telescope, named after Hyperia, a titan in Greek mythology, aims to be a titan in the telescope market, standing at 6 foot 9 in the open position and weighing 165 lbs. (75 kilograms). 

Hyperia is also set to be one of the most powerful instruments on the market as it can display resolutions up to 61 million pixels, according to Vaonis' website. However, with a price that starts at £45,000 (just under $61,480, it's definitely not for the casual stargazer looking for a deal. 

If you're looking for more affordable telescope options, you can see our best telescopes of 2021 feature for a rundown of our picks for the year. And if you're looking for an option for your budding astronomer, here's our best telescopes for kids

Review: Stellina Smart Telescope Makes Astrophotography a Breeze

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Sample images of night sky objects with the new Hyperia telescope from Vaonis.

A sample image of the Tarantula nebula as seen by the Hyperia telescope from Vaonis. (Image credit: Vaonis)
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Sample images of night sky objects with the new Hyperia telescope from Vaonis.

A sample image of the moon as seen by the Hyperia telescope from Vaonis. (Image credit: Vaonis)
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Sample images of night sky objects with the new Hyperia telescope from Vaonis.

A sample image of the star cluster 47 Tucanae as seen by the Hyperia telescope from Vaonis. (Image credit: Vaonis)
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Sample images of night sky objects with the new Hyperia telescope from Vaonis.

A sample image of the Sculptor galaxy as seen by the Hyperia telescope from Vaonis. (Image credit: Vaonis)
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Sample images of night sky objects with the new Hyperia telescope from Vaonis.

A sample image of the galaxy NGC 300 as seen by the Hyperia telescope from Vaonis. (Image credit: Vaonis)
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Sample images of night sky objects with the new Hyperia telescope from Vaonis.

A sample image of the M16 Eagle nebula as seen by the Hyperia telescope from Vaonis. (Image credit: Vaonis)
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Sample images of night sky objects with the new Hyperia telescope from Vaonis.

Another sample image of the Tarantula nebula as seen by the Hyperia telescope from Vaonis. (Image credit: Vaonis)

“Since the creation of Vaonis, we have been committed to making the exploration of the universe accessible to everyone," Vaonis founder Cyris Dupuy said in a statement. "Making the most efficient technologies on the market accessible to the most demanding public represents a new step taken for our company with the creation of Hyperia. Like the rest of our products,  ease of use and experience are in Hyperia's DNA."

According to Vaonis, the Hyperia telescope will be among the most powerful on the market and will be equipped with Direct Drive motorization that is used in the largest professional observatories, giving its users outstanding tracking quality and pointing speeds.

Anchored to the ground, Hyperia is designed to be stylish and durable. The material used for the telescope is Zicral, an alloy commonly used in the aerospace industry for its high quality mechanical performance and increased resistance to extreme conditions.  

For those interested in trying out Hyperia, you will be able to closely follow the manufacture of this mini-observatory with waiting periods expected to be anywhere between 12 and 18 months. Orders for the scope will only be taken from the Vaonis website

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Alexander Cox

STAFF WRITER, E-commerce — Alex joined Space.com in June 2021 as staff writer covering space news, games, tech, toys and deals. Based in London, U.K. Graduating in June 2020, Alex studied Sports Journalism in the North East of England at Sunderland University. During his studies and since his graduation, Alex has been featured in local newspapers and online publications covering a range of sports from university rugby to Premier League soccer. In addition to a background in sports and journalism, Alex has a life-long love of Star Wars which started with watching the prequel trilogy and collecting toy lightsabers, he also grew up spending most Saturday evenings watching Doctor Who. 


Contact Alexander: E-Mail Twitter