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Amazing photos of Comet NEOWISE from the Earth and space

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An unprocessed image from the WISPR instrument on NASA’s Parker Solar Probe shows Comet NEOWISE on July 5, 2020, shortly after its closest approach to the sun. The sun is out of frame to the left. The small black structure near the lower left of the image is caused by a grain of dust resting on the imager’s lens.

(Image credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Naval Research Lab/Parker Solar Probe/Brendan Gallagher)

Comet NEOWISE beamed into view this summer, glowing bright enough for skywatchers to spot it with the naked eye under dark skies. Skywatchers, spacecraft and even astronauts at the International Space Station have captured incredible photos of the icy wanderer. Click through this gallery to see images of the comet captured from Earth and space. 

Here: An unprocessed image from NASA's Parker Solar Probe shows Comet NEOWISE on July 5, 2020, shortly after its closest approach to the sun. 

Related: How to see Comet NEOWISE in the night sky right now

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(Image credit: Gianluca Masi/The Virtual Telescope Project)

The International Space Station seems to cross paths with Comet NEOWISE in the morning sky over Rome, Italy, in this photo captured by astrophysicist Gianluca Masi of the Virtual Telescope Project, on July 7, 2020. 

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Comet NEOWISE as seen from the International Space Station in a photograph shared by Russian cosmonaut Ivan Vagner on July 4, 2020.

(Image credit: Ivan Vagner/Roscosmos/NASA)

Russian cosmonaut Ivan Vagner captured this view of Comet NEOWISE from the International Space Station on July 4, 2020.

Full story: Comet NEOWISE shines in stunning photos from the International Space Station

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NASA astronaut Bob Behnken captured images of Comet NEOWISE from the International Space Station on July 4, 2020.

(Image credit: Bob Behnken/NASA)

NASA astronaut Bob Behnken, who arrived at the International Space Station May 31 with SpaceX's Crew Dragon Demo-2 mission,  captured this image of Comet NEOWISE from the International Space Station on July 4, 2020. 

Full story: Comet NEOWISE is 'an awesome sight' from space, astronaut says (video)

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(Image credit: Bill Ingalls/NASA)

NASA photographer Bill Ingalls captured this image of Comet NEOWISE over Washington, D.C. before sunrise on July 12, 2020. 

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(Image credit: Bill Ingalls/NASA)

Comet NEOWISE is pictured above the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C. before sunrise on July 12, 2020, in this view captured by NASA photographer Bill Ingalls.

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(Image credit: Bill Ingalls/NASA)

A closer view shows Comet NEOWISE glowing above the top of the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C. before sunrise on July 12, 2020.

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(Image credit: Gianluca Masi/The Virtual Telescope Project)

Astrophysicist Gianluca Masi of the Virtual Telescope Project captured this view of Comet NEOWISE above the St. Peter's Basilica in Rome before sunrise on July 10, 2020.

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Alexander Krivenyshev of WorldTimeZone.com captured this view of Comet NEOWISE over New York City, on July 8, 2020.

(Image credit: Alexander Krivenyshev/WorldTimeZone.com)

Alexander Krivenyshev of WorldTimeZone.com captured this view of Comet NEOWISE and the constellation Auriga over New York City, on July 8, 2020. 

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Processed data from the WISPR instrument on NASA’s Parker Solar Probe shows greater detail in the twin tails of comet NEOWISE, as seen on July 5, 2020. The lower, broader tail is the comet’s dust tail, while the thinner, upper tail is the comet’s ion tail.

(Image credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Naval Research Lab/Parker Solar Probe/Guillermo Stenborg)

Processed data from the WISPR instrument on NASA’s Parker Solar Probe shows greater detail in the twin tails of comet NEOWISE, as seen on July 5, 2020. The lower, broader tail is the comet’s dust tail, while the thinner, upper tail is the comet’s ion tail.

Full story: Dazzling Comet NEOWISE spotted by NASA sun-studying probe (photo)

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Skywatcher Michael Jager captured this view of Comet NEOWISE (C/2020 F3) on June 26 with a telescope.

(Image credit: MIchael Jager)

Skywatcher Michael Jager captured this view of Comet NEOWISE (C/2020 F3) on June 26 with a telescope. 

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Astrophotographer Chris Schur captured this view of Comet NEOWISE F3 from Payson, Arizona before dawn on July 5, 2020.

(Image credit: Chris Schur/Chris Schur Astrophotography)

Astrophotographer Chris Schur captured this view of Comet NEOWISE F3  from Payson, Arizona before dawn on July 5, 2020.

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Astrophotographer Chris Schur captured this view of Comet NEOWISE F3 from Payson, Arizona before dawn on July 5, 2020.

(Image credit: Chris Schur/Chris Schur Astrophotography)

Astrophotographer Chris Schur captured this view of Comet NEOWISE F3 from Payson, Arizona, before dawn on July 5, 2020.

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Images of comet NEOWISE recorded by the Planetary Science Institute’s Input/Output facility (false color presentation). Left: light reflected off of cometary dust, which generally follows the appearance to the naked eye. Right: light emitted by sodium atoms.

(Image credit: Jeffrey Morgenthaler/Carl Schmidt/Planetary Science Institute)

These false-color images of Comet NEOWISE show the concentration of sodium atoms in the comet's dusty ion tail. Astronomers created the images using the Planetary Science Institute's Input/Output facility near Tucson, Arizona. The image on the left shows light reflected off of cometary dust, while the image on the right shows light emitted by sodium atoms.

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