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How to Catch the Next Eclipse: A List of Solar and Lunar Eclipses in 2020 and Beyond

The moon blocks out the sun during a total solar eclipse.
(Image: © Corbis/Getty)

When the moon takes on a reddish color, or when the sun's corona shines like a glowing ring aloft in the sky, it's hard to ignore the sight. 

Lunar and solar eclipses have enchanted and even frightened humans for thousands of years. Most recently, skywatchers were treated to a total solar eclipse as its path crossed the Pacific Ocean and made landfall in La Serena, Chile, on Tuesday (July 2). Millions of spectators within and beyond the path of totality enjoyed the sight, which crossed South America until ending just south of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Eclipses aren't limited to one part of the world. In fact, there will be 20 lunar and solar eclipses traversing different places on Earth from now until the next North American cross-continental total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024. Here is a list of where these lunar and solar eclipses will pass, and what viewers can expect. Data is based on timetables and maps from NASA and the TimeAndDate.com.

Related: Best Photos of the 2019 Total Solar Eclipse

 

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(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Partial Lunar Eclipse on July 16, 2019

Lunar eclipses occur when the moon passes through Earth's shadow. In the blackness of space, it's hard to notice that Earth casts a cone-shaped shadow as sunlight moves through its atmosphere. But it does, and when the full moon clips part of the shadow, the lunar face appears red, either partially or entirely. T

he moon on July 16, 2019 will appear to dip a little more than half-way into a copperish coloring, peaking at 9:31 p.m. EDT (2131 GMT). The event will be centered over the African continent and central Eurasia. 

Image 2 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Annular Solar Eclipse of Dec. 26, 2019

Not quite a total solar eclipse, an annular solar eclipse looks like a ''ring of fire'' because the moon appears smaller in the sky than the disc of the sun, therefore blocking out the middle of the star with some of its body still appearing. As the moon orbits the Earth, it sometimes comes closer to the planet (the nearest point is called perigee) or farther away (the farther point is called apogee). This same phenomenon is what causes supermoons every so often. 

This event will hit the Arabian peninsula, travel across the northern part of the Indian Ocean, and will pass through Indonesia. The eclipse will peak at 12:17 a.m. EST (0517 GMT).

Image 3 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of Jan. 10, 2020

This lunar eclipse will be harder to notice than the one taking place in July 2019, because the moon will not pass through the darkest part of Earth's shadow. The moon will take on a tea-stained appearance during the penumbral eclipse and peak at 7:11 p.m. EST (1911 GMT). 

It will be visible throughout most of the world with the exception of the United States, central Canada, and a majority of South America. This will be the first of four penumbral lunar eclipses in 2020.

Image 4 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of June 5, 2020

About a year from now, the moon will again take on a slight saturation during the penumbral lunar eclipse of June 5 2020. The coloring will occur across half of the lunar face. Central and western Africa, southeast Asia and most of Australia will view the entire penumbral lunar eclipse, which peaks at 3:26 EDT (1926 GMT).

Image 5 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Annular Solar Eclipse of June 21, 2020

A few weeks after the penumbral lunar eclipse, the ''ring of fire'' will first appear over the Republic of the Congo, across Africa, pass over Yemen and Oman and keep going over parts of India and southern China. The eclipse will peak at 2:40 a.m. EDT (0640 GMT).

Image 6 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of July 5, 2020

The third penumbral lunar eclipse of 2020 will be visible from all of South America and most of North America. The slight shading will appear over less than half of the lunar face, peaking at 12:31 a.m. EDT (0431 GMT).

Image 7 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of Nov. 30, 2020

The moon will have a tea-stained appearance across most of its face during the final penumbral lunar eclipse of 2020. It will be visible from most places on the Earth except the African continent, the majority of Europe and central Eurasia. It will peak at 4:44 a.m. EST (0944 GMT).

Image 8 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Total Solar Eclipse of Dec. 14, 2020

Just weeks before the end of 2020, South America will once again experience a total solar eclipse. The path of totality will pass over the southern cone of the continent and end just before reaching Africa. It will peak at 11:43 a.m. EST (1613 GMT).

Image 9 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Total Lunar Eclipse of May 26, 2021

The entire surface of the lunar nearside will be flushed in red hues on May 26, 2021. The eclipse will be centered over the Pacific Ocean, where New Zealand and most of Australia will be able to watch the eclipse in its entirety. The total lunar eclipse peaks at 7:19 a.m. EDT (1119 GMT).

Image 10 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Annular Solar Eclipse of June 10, 2021

The frigid Arctic region that will experience the ''ring of fire'' this time around. A portion of northern Greenland, parts of nearby Baffin Bay, eastern Hudson Bay and northeastern Russia will sit in the path of the annular solar eclipse. This eclipse peaks at 6:41 a.m. EDT (1041 GMT).

Image 11 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Partial Lunar Eclipse of Nov. 19, 2021

Although the moon doesn't technically get itself entirely through the deepest part of Earth's shadow, or umbra, most of the lunar face will turn a vivid reddish-color. All 50 states will catch the eclipse in its entirety, which peaks at 4:04 a.m. EST (0904 GMT).

Image 12 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Total Solar Eclipse of Dec. 4, 2021

Weeks later, a total solar eclipse will cast a shadow across the Antarctic peninsula, which sits just below the southernmost tip of South America. It will peak at 2:33 a.m. EST (0733 GMT). If that timing seems puzzling, remember that the southern hemisphere is experiencing summer when the globe's northern half is battling winter, so the days are long and at some places near the poles, there is 24-hour daylight (and, during the winter, 24-hour night).

Image 13 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Total Lunar Eclipse of May 16, 2022

The moon will pass through the southern portion of Earth's deep shadow, and the total lunar eclipse will peak at 12:12 a.m. EDT (0412 GMT). As that timing suggests, the eclipse will be visible within the United States and South America.

Image 14 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Total Lunar Eclipse of Nov. 8, 2022

Almost six months later, another blood moon will appear in the sky. Most of the world will be able to see the moon turn a reddish-color, except Africa and Europe. This total lunar eclipse peaks at 6:00 a.m. EST (1100 GMT).

Image 15 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Total Solar Eclipse of April 20, 2023

Parts of Indonesia will be treated to a total solar eclipse on April 20, 2023. A 360-degree sunset will appear as the lunar disk blocks out all of the sun except for its corona, which will appear like a halo during totality. The eclipse peaks at 12:16 a.m. EDT (0416 GMT).

Image 16 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of May 5, 2023

All of the world except for North and South America will get to see the moon's color tinted slightly darker by the outer portion of Earth's shadow. The May 5, 2023 penumbral lunar eclipse will peak at 1:24 p.m. EDT (1724 GMT). 

Image 17 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Annular Solar Eclipse of Oct. 14, 2023

Parts of North and South America will be treated to an annular solar eclipse as the path of the event sweeps from the northwestern United States, through Central America and then onto Brazil. This eclipse peaks at 1:59 p.m. EDT (1759 GMT).

Related: Get Ready for 2 Solar Eclipses Coming to the US in 2023 and 2024

Image 18 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Partial Lunar Eclipse of Oct. 28, 2023

Less than a quarter of the moon will dip into the deep part of Earth's shadow, so just a corner of the lunar face will appear copperish-red. People in Africa, Europe and Asia will have the best view of the partial lunar eclipse, which peaks at 4:15 p.m. EDT (2015 GMT).

Image 19 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse of March 25, 2024

All of North America and most of South America will get to see the tea-tinted lunar face during the Mar. 25, 2024 penumbral eclipse. This event peaks at 3:13 a.m. EDT (0713 GMT).

Image 20 of 20

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

Total Solar Eclipse of April 8, 2024

Similar to the ''Great American Solar Eclipse" of 2017, the path of totality will cross North America from coast to coast. It will make landfall in Mexico, travel through Texas and head up all the way to Canada. This eclipse will peak at 2:17 p.m. EDT (1817 GMT). 

Related: Total Solar Eclipse of 2024: Here Are Maps of the 'Path of Totality'

Please note: There are several solar eclipses listed here, and spectators should ONLY observe the phenomenon directly if they have the aid of protective eclipse-viewing eyewear. The eclipse is just safe to view with the naked eye for the few moments during a total solar eclipse when the moon is blotting out the entire body of the star.

Editor's Note: If you captured an amazing photo or video of the total solar eclipse and would like to share it with Space.com's readers, please send your images with comments to spacephotos@space.com.

Follow Doris Elin Salazar on Twitter @salazar_elin. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook

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