Skip to main content

In Photos: Gemini 7 Makes 1st Crewed Rendezvous with Gemini 6A

LASER Demo

NASA

At the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas, Douglas S. Idlly demonstrates the Optical Communications Transmitter during a Nov. 10, 1965 briefing.

Peak of Physical Condition

NASA

Astronauts Jim Lovell (right) and Frank Borman view preflight physical chest X-rays with Dr. Charles A. Berry, chief of the Manned Spacecraft Center Medical Programs.

Setting a Baseline

NASA

After astronaut Jim Lovell works out on an exercise machine, Dr. Charles A. Berry takes his vitals. Data from the 14-day spaceflight will be compared to this baseline data following the mission.

Understanding Space's Effects

NASA

On Dec. 2, 1965, technicians attach electrodes to astronaut Frank Borman's head. Data gathered from the electrodes will help doctors understand the effects of weightlessness on alertness, consciousness and sleep.

Postflight Checks

NASA

On Jan. 19, 1966, astronaut Frank Borman completes a vision test following the successful Gemini 7 mission.

Food for the Journey

NASA

While on the 14-day Gemini 7 mission, astronauts Frank Borman and Jim Lovell consumed this pre-packaged food supply.

Testing for Space

NASA

On Oct. 25, 1965, astronaut Jim Lovell talks with (left to right) Charlie Beaty and Karl Stoien of McDonnell Aircraft Corporation, Al Rochferd, NASA suit technician and Norm Batterson of Weber Aircraft Corporation, while completing weight and balance tests at Kennedy Space Center.

Buckled and Ready

NASA

On Dec. 4, 1965, closed inside the Gemini 7 spacecraft, astronauts Frank Borman and Jim Lovell await launch for their 14-day mission.

Up the Ramp

NASA

On Dec. 4, 1965, astronaut Jim Lovell makes his was to the Gemini 7 spacecraft during the prelaunch countdown.

Suiting Up

NASA

NASA spacesuit technician Clyde Teague talks with astronaut Jim Lovell as he suits up for the Gemini 7 mission. Lovell dons the new light-weight spacesuit.

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: community@space.com.