Best Space Stories of the Week — August 23, 2015
An artist's concept of an inflatable space elevator design patented by the Canadian company Thoth Technology, Inc. The elevator would lift passengers to an altitude of 12 miles (20 kilometers) where they could catch a commercial spacecraft launch into orbit.
Credit: Thoth Technology. Inc.

Scientists created a "magnetic wormhole" in the lab, a Canadian company got a patent for a huge inflatable space elevator and the mystery of the "singing" comet may be solved. Here are Space.com's top stories of the week. 

Scientists create 'magnetic wormhole'

It sounds ripped from the pages of a sci-fi novel: Physicists have crafted a wormhole that tunnels a magnetic field through space. [Full Story: Wormhole Created in Lab Makes Invisible Magnetic Field]

Patent granted for space elevator

The space elevator may be one step closer to reality. A Canadian company was recently awarded a patent for a space elevator that would reach about 12 miles (20 kilometers) above the Earth's surface. [Full Story: Wild Inflatable Space Elevator Idea Could Lift People 12 Miles Up]

The Mars Hoax is back (again)

The infamous Mars Hoax that has circulated widely through the Internet since its first appearance in 2003, when it originated in the form of an email message titled "Mars Spectacular," has reared its ugly head yet again. [Full Story: Mars Hoax Returns to Mislead Stargazers]

Mystery of 'singing' comet solved?

The source of a strange "song" that was belted out by Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it hurtled through space may have finally been found. [Full Story: Why Does Comet 67P Sing? Scientists Think They Know]

Astronaut photos show red 'sprites' reaching into space

Two stunning photos taken from the International Space Station show two huge, red "sprites" generated by thunderstorms over Mexico reaching up into space. [Full Story: Enormous Red Sprites Seen From Space (Update)]

NASA debunks asteroid-strike rumor

For the last few months, rumors have circulated on the Internet that a big asteroid will slam into Earth near Puerto Rico between Sept. 15 and Sept. 28, wreaking widespread destruction. Don't believe the hype. [Full Story: No Asteroid Is Threatening to Hit Earth Next Month, NASA Says]

Mice and more launch toward space station

A robotic Japanese cargo vessel launched toward the International Space Station Wednesday morning (Aug. 19), embarking on a five-day journey to the orbiting lab to deliver tons of supplies and experiment gear, including a rodent crew of 12 mice. [Full Story: Japan Launches Vital Supplies (and Mice) Toward International Space Station]

New trailer for 'The Martian' released

The new trailer for the upcoming sci-fi blockbuster "The Martian" brings up questions about the value of a single human life in space. [Full Story: Epic Trailer for 'The Martian' Questions the Value of a Human Life in Space]

Inflatable habitats could aid moon, Mars exploration

The upcoming launch of an inflatable module toward the International Space Station could help pave the way for human bases on the moon and Mars. [Full Story: Inflatable Habitats: From the Space Station to the Moon and Mars?]

Will NASA's Mars 2020 rover land in Jezero Crater?

The 28-mile-wide (45 kilometers) Jezero Crater emerged as the frontrunner among 30 or so potential locales during the second landing-site workshop for NASA's 2020 Mars rover mission. [Full Story: Where Will NASA's 2020 Mars Rover Land?]

Shining a light on dark energy and dark matter

Two experiments on Earth are helping to shine light on the hidden characteristics of dark energy and dark matter — elusive phenomena that make up nearly 95 percent of the universe but remain hidden from direct detection. [Full Story: Where Is All the Dark Energy and Dark Matter?]

Elusive neutrinos spotted in Antarctica

Buried deep in the Antarctic ice, an observatory has spotted ghostly, nearly massless particles coming from inside our galaxy and points beyond the Milky Way. [Full Story: Ghostly Particles from Outer Space Detected in Antarctica]
 

First Chinese experiment launching to space station

A Chinese experiment is being readied for launch toward the International Space Station in what could be the forerunner of a larger space-cooperation agenda between the United States and China. [Full Story: US-China Space Freeze May Thaw with Historic New Experiment]

First ad on the moon launching in 2016

The Japan-based Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. aims to land a special "time capsule" can of the Pocari Sweat sports drink on the moon next year. The capsule will be delivered to the lunar surface by Astrobotic Technology's Griffin lander, which will launch aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket in late 2016, if all goes according to plan. [Full Story: First Ad on the Moon: Lunar Billboard for Pocari Sweat to Fly in 2016]

Follow Mike Wall on Twitter @michaeldwall and Google+. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook or Google+. Originally published on Space.com.

Scientists created a "magnetic wormhole" in the lab, a Canadian company got a patent for a huge inflatable space elevator and the mystery of the "singing" comet may be solved. Here are Space.com's top stories of the week. 

Scientists create 'magnetic wormhole'

It sounds ripped from the pages of a sci-fi novel: Physicists have crafted a wormhole that tunnels a magnetic field through space. [Full Story: Wormhole Created in Lab Makes Invisible Magnetic Field]

Patent granted for space elevator

The space elevator may be one step closer to reality. A Canadian company was recently awarded a patent for a space elevator that would reach about 12 miles (20 kilometers) above the Earth's surface. [Full Story: Wild Inflatable Space Elevator Idea Could Lift People 12 Miles Up]

The Mars Hoax is back (again)

The infamous Mars Hoax that has circulated widely through the Internet since its first appearance in 2003, when it originated in the form of an email message titled "Mars Spectacular," has reared its ugly head yet again. [Full Story: Mars Hoax Returns to Mislead Stargazers]

Mystery of 'singing' comet solved?

The source of a strange "song" that was belted out by Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it hurtled through space may have finally been found. [Full Story: Why Does Comet 67P Sing? Scientists Think They Know]

Astronaut photos show red 'sprites' reaching into space

Two stunning photos taken from the International Space Station show two huge, red "sprites" generated by thunderstorms over Mexico reaching up into space. [Full Story: Enormous Red Sprites Seen From Space (Update)]

NASA debunks asteroid-strike rumor

For the last few months, rumors have circulated on the Internet that a big asteroid will slam into Earth near Puerto Rico between Sept. 15 and Sept. 28, wreaking widespread destruction. Don't believe the hype. [Full Story: No Asteroid Is Threatening to Hit Earth Next Month, NASA Says]

Mice and more launch toward space station

A robotic Japanese cargo vessel launched toward the International Space Station Wednesday morning (Aug. 19), embarking on a five-day journey to the orbiting lab to deliver tons of supplies and experiment gear, including a rodent crew of 12 mice. [Full Story: Japan Launches Vital Supplies (and Mice) Toward International Space Station]

New trailer for 'The Martian' released

The new trailer for the upcoming sci-fi blockbuster "The Martian" brings up questions about the value of a single human life in space. [Full Story: Epic Trailer for 'The Martian' Questions the Value of a Human Life in Space]

Inflatable habitats could aid moon, Mars exploration

The upcoming launch of an inflatable module toward the International Space Station could help pave the way for human bases on the moon and Mars. [Full Story: Inflatable Habitats: From the Space Station to the Moon and Mars?]

Will NASA's Mars 2020 rover land in Jezero Crater?

The 28-mile-wide (45 kilometers) Jezero Crater emerged as the frontrunner among 30 or so potential locales during the second landing-site workshop for NASA's 2020 Mars rover mission. [Full Story: Where Will NASA's 2020 Mars Rover Land?]

Shining a light on dark energy and dark matter

Two experiments on Earth are helping to shine light on the hidden characteristics of dark energy and dark matter — elusive phenomena that make up nearly 95 percent of the universe but remain hidden from direct detection. [Full Story: Where Is All the Dark Energy and Dark Matter?]

Elusive neutrinos spotted in Antarctica

Buried deep in the Antarctic ice, an observatory has spotted ghostly, nearly massless particles coming from inside our galaxy and points beyond the Milky Way. [Full Story: Ghostly Particles from Outer Space Detected in Antarctica]
 

First Chinese experiment launching to space station

A Chinese experiment is being readied for launch toward the International Space Station in what could be the forerunner of a larger space-cooperation agenda between the United States and China. [Full Story: US-China Space Freeze May Thaw with Historic New Experiment]

First ad on the moon launching in 2016

The Japan-based Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. aims to land a special "time capsule" can of the Pocari Sweat sports drink on the moon next year. The capsule will be delivered to the lunar surface by Astrobotic Technology's Griffin lander, which will launch aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket in late 2016, if all goes according to plan. [Full Story: First Ad on the Moon: Lunar Billboard for Pocari Sweat to Fly in 2016]

Follow Mike Wall on Twitter @michaeldwall and Google+. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook or Google+. Originally published on Space.com.