Photos from NASA's Voyager 1 and 2 Probes

Voyager 1 Entering Interstellar Space

NASA/JPL-Caltech

This artist's concept depicts NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft entering interstellar space, or the space between stars. Interstellar space is dominated by the plasma, or ionized gas, that was ejected by the death of nearby giant stars millions of years ago. The environment inside our solar bubble is dominated by the plasma exhausted by our sun, known as the solar wind. The interstellar plasma is shown with an orange glow similar to the color seen in visible-light images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope that show stars in the Orion nebula traveling through interstellar space. Image released Sept. 12, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

Locations of Voyager 1 and 2 as Voyager 1 Enters Interstellar Space

NASA/JPL-Caltech

This artist's concept shows the general locations of NASA's two Voyager spacecraft. Voyager 1 (top) has sailed beyond our solar bubble into interstellar space, the space between stars. Its environment still feels the solar influence. Voyager 2 (bottom) is still exploring the outer layer of the solar bubble. Image released Sept. 12, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

Voyager Signal Spotted By Earth Radio Telescopes

NRAO/AUI/NSF

In 1990, Voyager 1 took the famous "Pale Blue Dot" picture looking back at Earth. In 2013, the Very Long Baseline Array got the reverse-angle shot — this radio telescope image showing the signal of the spacecraft as a similar point of light. Image released Sept. 12, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

NASA Press Conference Regarding Voyager 1

NASA TV

NASA held a news conference Sept. 12, 2013, at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT), to discuss NASA's Voyager mission. The news conference was held in Washington, DC, at NASA Headquarters. [Read the Full Story Here]

Voyager 1's Next Destination

NASA TV

A star field image shows Voyager 1 spacecraft's next destination in the universe (circled). According to NASA, "In about 40,000 years, Voyager 1 will drift within 1.6 light-years (9.3 trillion miles) of AC+79 3888, a star in the constellation of Camelopardalis which is heading toward the constellation Ophiuchus." Image released Sept. 12, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

Earth and Moon from Voyager's Perspective

NASA

This image of the Earth and moon in a single frame, the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft, was recorded on Sept. 18, 1977, by Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles from Earth. The moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. [Read the Full Story Here]

Ed Stone at Voyager 1 Press Conference

NASA TV

Ed Stone holds a Voyager spacecraft model. NASA held a news conference Sept. 12, 2013, at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT), to discuss NASA's Voyager mission. The news conference was held in Washington, DC, at NASA Headquarters. [Read the Full Story Here]

Pale Blue Dot

NASA/JPL

This narrow-angle color image of the Earth s a part of the first ever "portrait" of the solar system taken by Voyager 1. The spacecraft acquired a total of 60 frames for a mosaic of the solar system from a distance of more than 4 billion miles from Earth and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic. Image released Feb. 14, 1990. [Read the Full Story Here]

John Grunsfeld at Voyager Announcement

NASA TV

John M. Grunsfeld, Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, introduces the Voyager press conference. NASA held a news conference Sept. 12, 2013, at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT), to discuss NASA's Voyager mission. The news conference was held in Washington, DC, at NASA Headquarters. [Read the Full Story Here]

Long Way From Home

NASA

This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and moon -- the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft -- was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 2 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. Because the Earth is many times brighter than the moon, the moon was artificially brightened so that both bodies would show clearly in the prints.

Voyager 1

NASA

An artist's illustration of NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft, the farthest human-built object from Earth, which launched in 1977 and is headed for interstellar space.

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