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'Moons of Madness': 6 Ways This New Space Game Is Terrifying (Video)

Check out the haunting encounters a player can experience in the new video game "Moons of Madness" in this video. A disappearing apparition and a nimble multilimbed monster are some of the most frightening sights in the game.

Today (Oct. 22), video-game developer Rock Pocket Games and publisher Funcom release "Moons of Madness," an out-of-this world horror game, so those wanting to add some fright to their October ahead of Halloween can fire up their gaming PC and give this story a go.

"The game is set on the planet Mars in a not-so-distant future, and mixes the scientific exploration of the red planet with the supernatural dread of Lovecraftian horror," Funcom representatives shared in a March 2019 news release. 

Related: A Photo Tour of the Creepy Mars Base from 'Moons of Madness'
Video:
6 Ways 'Moons of Madness' Makes Mars Terrifying

The artwork for "Moons of Madness," a 2019 P.C. game developed by Rock Pocket Games and published by Funcom. It will be available for PS4 and XBOX in late January 2020.  (Image credit: Funcom/Rock Pocket Games)

This single-player game offers beautiful interiors and their scary transformation as trick-or-treats for the eyes. Cryptic messaging also pique the mind's interest. Wrapping up this space horror story in a creepy bow-tie is its cast of nasty alien and ghost-like creatures. Here's why "Moons of Madness" just might haunt your dreams.

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This single-player game offers beautiful interiors and their scary transformation as trick-or-treats for the eyes. Cryptic messaging also pique the mind's interest. Wrapping up this space horror story in a creepy bow-tie is its cast of nasty alien and ghost-like creatures. Here's why "Moons of Madness" just might haunt your dreams.

(Image credit: Funcom/Rock Pocket Games)

1. Mars monsters?

Cryptic letters hint at the monsters lurking on the Martian base where "Moons of Madness" is set. The letter features a spooky Eye of Horus, where the ancient Egyptian symbol has been modified with two tentacles. 

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Monster tentacles wrap around a skull in "Moons of Madness."

(Image credit: Funcom/Rock Pocket Games)

2. Creepy tentacles

Tentacles wrap around a skull near this creepy altar-like setting. Candles and skulls enhance the horror mood.

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The "Thing In The Mist" may jump out at you when attempting to turn a switch outside the base.

(Image credit: Funcom/Rock Pocket Games)

3. There's a "thing in the mist"

The "Thing In The Mist" may jump out at a player when prompted to turn on a switch outside the base.

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A maintenance task list is written over by a mysterious message in "Moons of Madness."

(Image credit: Funcom/Rock Pocket Games)

4. "They Never Turn Away!"

A bulletin board with maintenance duties scribbled on it has been written over with the enigmatic words: "They Never Turn Away!" 

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In a blackout, your avatar notices runaway vines all along the walls of the base in "Moons of Madness."

(Image credit: Funcom/Rock Pocket Games)

5. Aliens

The nasty sprawl of alien appendages branch out along the walls of the Martian base's corridors.

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A green apparition sits near a birthday party setup and isn't as approachable as she seems.

(Image credit: Funcom/Rock Pocket Games)

6. Where'd those balloons come from?

"Come, blow out my candles," this creepy character asks. She sits near an unlucky (13) number of balloons. A party hat and a birthday cake are beside her. 

"Moons of Madness" will also be available for XBox and Playstation 4 on Jan. 21, 2020. 

Follow Doris Elin Urrutia on Twitter @salazar_elin. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook

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Doris Elin Urrutia

Doris Elin Urrutia joined Space.com as an intern in the summer of 2017. She received a B.A. in Sociology and Communications at Fordham University in New York City. Her work was previously published in collaboration with London Mining Network. Her passion for geology and the cosmos started when she helped her sister build a model solar system in a Bronx library. Doris also likes learning new ways to prepare the basil sitting on her windowsill. Follow her on twitter at @salazar_elin.