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As a science fiction fan, I've always shuddered at the thought of an alien bursting out of my chest. But I've never thought about what it might be like to be the one doing the chest-bursting. That is, until now.

The team behind the upcoming "Alien: Covenant" — the latest entry in Ridley Scott's "Alien" science fiction franchise — has released a virtual reality experience that shows exactly what it's like to be one of the horror film's neomorph aliens. Called "Alien: Covenant In Utero," the short video portrays the birth of the neomorph from the inside out — literally — as the alien is born and identifies its first victim. Spoiler alert: It gets bloody.

"'Alien: Covenant In Utero' is a 360-degree virtual reality journey into a living nightmare and offers a terrifyingly close and personal encounter as an alien neomorph at the time of its birth," a YouTube video description states. "Fans will be able to experience the world around them, reliving the very first memories of the neomorph in an immersive environment." [Private Audi Quattro Moon Rover Has Cameo in 'Alien: Covenant']

The "In Utero" feature was released Wednesday (May 10) by FoxNext VR Studio and is available for brave science fiction fans on Oculus, Samsung Gear VR, HTC Vive, Playstation VR, Google Daydream and as well as other mobile VR systems. 

"Alien: Covenant" hits theaters May 19 and follows the crew of the Covenant, the titular colony ship, hoping to start a new life on a distant planet on the other side of the galaxy. What they find, of course, is the neomorph and science fiction horror ensues. 

So, do you have what it takes to become a neomorph? Check out the VR experience on your own system and let us know in the comments below!

Editor's note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that "Alien: Covenant In Utero" was released by 20th Century Fox. The virtual reality experience was released by FoxNext VR Studio.

Email Tariq Malik at tmalik@space.com or follow him @tariqjmalik and Google+. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original article on Space.com.