Photos: Russian Meteor Explosion of Feb. 15, 2013

Impact Site of the Main Mass of the Chelyabinsk Meteorite

Eduard Kalinin

Impact site of the main mass of the Chelyabinsk meteorite in the ice of Lake Chebarkul. Image released Nov. 6, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

Russian Meteor Explosion: 3D Trajectory

Andrea Carvey, Mark Boslough & Brad Carvey

This 3D simulation of the Chelyabinsk meteor explosion of Feb. 15, 2013 by Mark Boslough was rendered by Brad Carvey using the CTH code on Sandia National Laboratories' Red Sky supercomputer. Andrea Carvey composited wireframe tail. [Read the Full Story Here]

Main Mass of the Chelyabinsk Meteorite Fall

Science/AAAS

Main mass of the Chelyabinsk fall at the Chelyabinsk State Museum of Local History shortly after recovery from Chebarkul Lake. Photo courtesy of Andrey Yarantsev. Image released Nov. 6, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

Chelyabinsk Meteorite Showing Shock Veins

Science/AAAS

Chelyabinsk meteorite (diameter ~4 cm) showing shock veins. Image released Nov. 6, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

Russian Meteor Explosion: Trajectory

Jiri Borovicka

This map shows the ground projection of the trajectory of the Chelyabinsk meteor, or bolide, and the location of the impact hole (Crater) in the ice of Lake Chebarkul on Feb. 15, 2013. The bolide moved from right to left. [Read the Full Story Here]

Small Meteorite Fragments from Chebarkul Lake

Science/AAAS

Small meteorite fragments (left) recovered by a Ural Federal University research team from Chebarkul Lake near the hole in the ice layer, shown (right) in an airborne photograph taken by Eduard Kalinin from a Diamond C2 aircraft shortly after the hole's discovery on February 16th at 11:05:34 UT. [Read the Full Story Here]

Fragments of Chelyabinsk (C2-C6)

Science/AAAS

Fragments of Chelyabinsk (C2 - C6) analyzed in this study. Find locations are marked. C2 is an oriented meteorite; it travelled with its flat side forward. Its backside is shown. Image released Nov. 6, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

Russian Meteor Explosion: Solar System Orbit

Jiri Borovicka

This graphic depicts the orbit of the asteroid that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia on Feb. 15, 2013, as it compared with the known orbits of other meteorites. The orbits of planets Mercury to Jupiter are shown in black (the thick circle is the Earth's orbit). [Read the Full Story Here]

Russian Meteor Explosion: Meteorite Impacts

Jiri Borovicka

This map shows the ground projection of the terminal parts of the trajectories of the Chelyabinsk meteor explosion (a bolide) fragments and the computed impact positions of some fragments seen on the videos of the bolide on Feb. 15, 2013. The fragment F1, which landed in Lake Chebarkul, was by far the most massive. [Read the Full Story Here]

Shock Melt Vein in Meteorite from Chelyabinsk

M. Zolensky/NASA JSC

Iron grains line the rim of a shock melt vein in meteorite Chelyabinsk. Shock melt veins are weak sections along which meteorites can fragment. Image released Nov. 6, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

Russian Meteor Explosion:Asteroid Orbit

russia meteor explosion, Chelyabinsk asteroid, Chelyabinsk meteor, asteroid threat to Earth, asteroid impacts, dangerous asteroids

This map shows the orbit of Chelyabinsk asteroid that exploded over Russian on Feb. 15, 2013, as compared with the orbit of asteroid 86039. The orbits of planets Mercury to Jupiter are shown in black (the thick circle is the Earth's orbit). [Read the Full Story Here]

Have a news tip, correction or comment? Let us know at community@space.com.