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Destination Pluto: NASA's New Horizons Mission in Pictures

Proposed New Horizons Stamp

NASA/SWRI/Dan Durda

Artist Dan Durda's concept for a U.S. postage stamp honoring the New Horizons mission to Pluto. The probe's team has launched an online petition to make the stamp a reality

NASA's New Horizons Spacecraft Sees Jupiter and Io

NASA/JHU/APL.

NASA's New Horizons snapped this view of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io in early January 2007.

Io Through Different 'Eyes'

NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

This montage demonstrates New Horizons' ability to observe the same target in complementary ways using its diverse suite of instruments. The image was released on May 1, 2007.

Jupiter's Moons: Family Portrait

NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

This montage shows the best views of Jupiter's four large and diverse "Galilean" satellites as seen by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on the New Horizons spacecraft during its flyby of Jupiter in late February 2007. The image was released in May 1, 2007.

Polar Lightning on Jupiter

NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Images taken by the New Horizons Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) of Jupiter’s night side showed lightning strikes. Each “strike” is probably the cumulative brightness of multiple strikes.

To Pluto with Postage: Nine Souvenirs Stow Away on NASA Probe

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute (JHUAPL/SwRI)

This artist's rendering depicts the New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches Pluto and its moons in summer 2015.

Io in Eclipse 2

NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

This image of Io eclipsed by Jupiter's shadow is a combination of several images taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) about 28 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The image was released on May 1, 2007.

Pluto-bound Probe Snaps Photo of Jupiter

The first picture of the Jupiter from the New Horizon spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), taken Sept. 4, 2006, is a tantalizing promise of what's to come when New Horizons flies through the Jupiter system early next year.

Pluto-bound Probe Snaps First Photo

NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

On Aug. 29, 2006, the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) opened its launch cover door and took its first image in space, of Messier 7, a star cluster in our Milky Way galaxy. The image shows the center of Messier 7, which was catalogued by Charles Messier in 1764, and described by Ptolemy around 130 A.D. Stars to at least 12th magnitude are clearly visible, meaning LORRI's sensitivity and noise levels in space are consistent with its pre-launch calibrations on the ground. Directionally, north is at the top of the images, east is to the left.

New Horizons: Outbound For Jupiter Flyby

KBO: Artist's impression of the New Horizons spacecraft meeting up with a Kuiper Belt object. The Sun is more than 4.1 billion miles (6.7 billion kilometers) away. Jupiter and Neptune are visible as orange and blue stars to the right of the Sun. Though KBOs would not be so visible at any one moment, they're shown here to illustrate the extensive disk of icy worlds beyond Neptune.

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Space.com Staff

Space.com is the premier source of space exploration, innovation and astronomy news, chronicling (and celebrating) humanity's ongoing expansion across the final frontier. Originally founded in 1999, Space.com is, and always has been, the passion of writers and editors who are space fans and also trained journalists. Our current news team consists of Editor-in-Chief Tariq Malik; Editor Hanneke Weitering, Senior Space Writer Mike Wall; Senior Writer Meghan Bartels; Senior Writer Chelsea Gohd, Senior Writer Tereza Pultarova and Staff Writer Alexander Cox. Senior Producer Steve Spaleta oversees our space videos, with Kim Hickock as our Reference Editor and Diana Whitcroft as our Social Media Editor.