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Destination Pluto: NASA's New Horizons Mission in Pictures

Artist's Concept of New Horizons at Pluto

NASA/JHU APL/SwRI/Steve Gribben

An artist's illustration of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft as it approaches Pluto. Pluto's largest moon, Charon, hovers in the background.

July 13, 2015, New Horizons Image of Pluto

NASA/APL/SwRI

The New Horizons probe captured a sneak peak of gorgeous Pluto! According to the New Horizons social media team, this is the last and most detailed image of Pluto sent to Earth before the moment of closest approach - 7:49 a.m. EDT on July 14. Read the Full Story.

New Horizons Flight Controllers Celebrate

NASA/Bill Ingalls

Flight controllers of New Horizons space probe react with jubilation after receiving confirmation that it had completed the historic flyby of Pluto successfully on July 14, 2015,

New Horizons Pluto Flyby Success Confirmed

NASA TV

New Horizons mission operations manager Alice Bowman (right) announces that the spacecraft survived its epic Pluto flyby on July 14, 2015, and is in good shape.

PLUTO: NOT YET EXPLORED

NASA/Bill Ingalls

New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern (left) and other researchers hold a print of a "corrected" U.S. stamp at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland. The New Horizons spacecraft flew past Pluto, July 14, 2015.

New Horizons Closest Approach to Pluto

NASA TV

At the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland, over 1000 people gathered for New Horizons' historic flyby of Pluto on July 14, 2015. Principal Investigator Alan Stern faces the camera just left of center (partially obscured).

Stern Interviewed Following New Horizons Pluto Flyby

NASA TV

At the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland, New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern (center) is interviewed only moments after the Pluto probe made its historic flyby of the mysterious planet on July 14, 2015.

New Horizons Press Conference

NASA TV

At the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland, a press conference was held after the New Horizons Pluto probe made its historic flyby on July 14, 2015.

Pluto's Size Determined

NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

NASA’s New Horizons mission provided data measuring Pluto at 1,473 miles (2,370 kilometers) in diameter. Pluto's moon Charon is at left. Image obtained July 11, 2015.

Pluto, July 12, 2015

NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

New Horizons captured this photo of Pluto on July 12, 2015 from a distance of 1.6 million miles (2.5 million kilometers).

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Space.com Staff

Space.com is the premier source of space exploration, innovation and astronomy news, chronicling (and celebrating) humanity's ongoing expansion across the final frontier. Originally founded in 1999, Space.com is, and always has been, the passion of writers and editors who are space fans and also trained journalists. Our current news team consists of Editor-in-Chief Tariq Malik; Editor Hanneke Weitering, Senior Space Writer Mike Wall; Senior Writer Meghan Bartels; Senior Writer Chelsea Gohd, Senior Writer Tereza Pultarova and Staff Writer Alexander Cox, focusing on e-commerce. Senior Producer Steve Spaleta oversees our space videos, with Diana Whitcroft as our Social Media Editor.