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'Ring of fire' solar eclipse 2021: See amazing photos from stargazers

The first solar eclipse of the year occurred Thursday (June 10) as the moon will passed in front of the sun and create the illusion of a "ring of fire" in the sky in northern Canada, Greenland and the Arctic. Other parts of the Northern Hemisphere saw a sunrise partial eclipse. See stunning photos of the June 10 "ring of fire" solar eclipse from stargazers around the world. 

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The eclipsed sun rises over the U.S. Capitol Building on June 10, 2021, in an image from NASA photographer Bill Ingalls.

(Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

NASA photographer Bill Ingalls captured this amazing view of a crescent sun rising behind the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C., where only a partial solar eclipse was visible on June 10. 

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Students in Belgium use eclipse glasses to observe the partial solar eclipse on June 10, 2021, as photographed by Kurt Desplenter.

(Image credit: Kurt Desplenter/Belga Mag/AFP via Getty Images)

Students in Belgium use eclipse glasses to observe the partial solar eclipse on June 10, 2021, as photographed by Kurt Desplenter.

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The Statue of Liberty and the partial solar eclipse of June 10, 2021, as photographed by Gary Hershorn.

(Image credit: Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)

The Statue of Liberty and the partial solar eclipse of June 10, 2021, as photographed by Gary Hershorn.

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The eclipsed sun shimmers off Fathom Five National Marine Park in Ontario on June 10, 2021, as photographed by Geoff Robins.

(Image credit: Geoff Robins/AFP via Getty Images)

The eclipsed sun shimmers off Fathom Five National Marine Park in Ontario on June 10, 2021, as photographed by Geoff Robins.

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The eclipsed sun seen next to London's Big Ben on June 10, 2021, as photographed by Dan Kitwood.

(Image credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

The eclipsed sun seen next to London's Big Ben on June 10, 2021, as photographed by Dan Kitwood.

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Photographers line up in Jersey City to capture the sunrise eclipse over Manhattan's iconic skyline on June 10, 2021, as seen by Tayfun Coskun.

(Image credit: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Photographers line up in Jersey City to capture the sunrise eclipse over Manhattan's iconic skyline on June 10, 2021, as seen by Tayfun Coskun.

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A partial solar eclipse seen during sunrise at Delaware Breakwater Lighthouse on June 10, 2021.

(Image credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

Meanwhile, in Delaware, another NASA photographer watched the June 10 solar eclipse as it rose over Lewes Beach. 

Photographer Aubrey Gemignani captured this view of the Delaware Breakwater Lighthouse as the eclipse rose over it. 

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A partial solar eclipse seen at sunrise with the U.S. Capitol building on display in an image taken June 10, 2021, by NASA photographer Bill Ingalls.

(Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

The partial solar eclipse of June 10 rises on the horizon just to the left of the U.S. Capitol building in this second view from NASA photographer Bill Ingalls. 

Ingalls captured his images from Arlington, Virginia.

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A skywatcher in London uses a sextant to observe the partial solar eclipse on June 10, 2021.

(Image credit: Niklas HALLE'N / AFP) (Photo by NIKLAS Halle'n/AFP via Getty Images)

A skywatcher in London uses a sextant to observe the partial solar eclipse on June 10, 2021.

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The partial solar eclipse of June 10, 2021, seen reflected in glass from a Manhattan skyscraper by Ed Jones.

(Image credit: Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images)

The partial solar eclipse of June 10, 2021, seen reflected in glass from a Manhattan skyscraper by Ed Jones.

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The Statue of Liberty seen against the eerie sky of the June 10, 2021, solar eclipse, as photographed by Kena Betancur.

(Image credit: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images)

The Statue of Liberty seen against the eerie sky of the June 10, 2021, solar eclipse, as photographed by Kena Betancur.

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A view of the partially eclipsed sun rising over the Delaware Breakwater Lighthouse on June 10, 2021, by Aubrey Gemignani.

(Image credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

This second view of the June 10 solar eclipse shows a clear view of the crescent sun over Delaware Breakwater Lighthouse as seen by NASA photographer Aubrey Gemignani from Lewes Beach in Delaware at sunrise.

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Skywatchers in Toronto use homemade eclipse viewers to watch the solar eclipse on June 10, 2021.

(Image credit: Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Skywatchers in Toronto use homemade eclipse viewers to watch the solar eclipse on June 10, 2021.

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The eclipsed sun rising over Toronto on June 10, 2021, as seen by Steve Russell.

(Image credit: Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

The eclipsed sun rising over Toronto on June 10, 2021, as seen by Steve Russell.

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This map of the eclipse path shows where the June 10, 2021, annular and partial solar eclipse will occur.

(Image credit: Ernie Wright/NASA)

This map of the eclipse path shows where the June 10, 2021, annular and partial solar eclipse will occur. Skywatchers in much of central and eastern North America, as well as parts of Europe and Africa, saw a partial solar eclipse, but the "ring of fire" effect was limited to a narrow and scarcely-populated slice of land in central and eastern Canada.

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A composite of images of an annular solar eclipse shows several stages, left to right, as the moon passes in front of the sun.

(Image credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

A composite of images of an annular solar eclipse shows several stages, left to right, as the moon passes in front of the sun. The solar eclipse on June 10 began at 4:12 a.m. EDT (0812 GMT), when the moon first appeared to make contact with the sun from Earth's perspective. A "ring of fire" became visible along the path of annularity at 5:49 a.m. EDT (0949 GMT), with the moment of maximum eclipse occurring at 6:41 a.m. EDT (1041 GMT).

Related: The 'ring of fire' solar eclipse of 2021: What time does it begin?



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When the new moon is just at the right distance in its orbit to completely blot out the sun, we witness a total solar eclipse. But when the new moon is slightly farther from Earth in its orbit, it doesn't quite cover the full solar disk. In these cases, we can enjoy the sight of a blazing ring of sunlight encircling the silhouette of the moon — but must take care to observe only through a safe solar filter.

(Image credit: Sky & Telescope)

Annular eclipses are similar to total solar eclipses, but the key difference is that the moon will not completely cover the sun. When the moon is farther from Earth, it appears smaller in the sky than it does when it is closer to Earth. Because some of the sun's disk glows around the moon's edge, annular eclipses should never be observed without proper eye protection.


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A visualization of an annular solar eclipse.

(Image credit: Dale Cruishank/NASA)

A visualization of an annular solar eclipse.

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A NASA animation of the annular solar eclipse's predicted path on June 10, 2021.

(Image credit: A.T. Sinclar/NASA GSFC)

A NASA animation of the annular solar eclipse's predicted path on June 10, 2021.

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The June 10 solar eclipse is visible primarily in the Northeast U.S and Canada, plus Northwest Europe. A small strip across Eastern Canada will experience it as an annular eclipse.

(Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

The partial solar eclipse is visible primarily in the Northeast U.S. and Canada, plus Northwest Europe. A small strip across Eastern Canada will experience it as an annular eclipse.

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This map shows how the solar eclipse of June 10, 2021 will appear from cities in the eastern U.S.

(Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This map shows how the partial solar eclipse of June 10, 2021 will appear from cities in North America, where the eclipse will happen at sunrise.

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Table showing timing of the June 10, 2021 solar eclipse from various locations.

(Image credit: Future)

Table showing timing of the June 10, 2021 solar eclipse from various locations.

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Table showing timing of the June 10, 2021 solar eclipse from various locations in Europe and Africa.

(Image credit: Future)

Table showing timing of the June 10, 2021 solar eclipse from various locations in Europe and Africa.

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A NASA map of the path of the June 10, 2021 annular solar eclipse shows the journey it will take across Earth's northernmost regions.

(Image credit: Fred Espenak/NASA)

A NASA map of the path of the June 10, 2021 annular solar eclipse shows the journey it will take across Earth's northernmost regions.

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(Image credit: Karl Tate/Space.com)

You should never look directly at the sun, but there are ways to safely observe an eclipse.

Related: How to make a solar eclipse viewer: Step-by-step photo guide
See also:
Is it safe to reuse your solar eclipse glasses?

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