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A Brief History of Solar Eclipses, From 1900 to 2017 (Gallery)

Fluffy glow

Fox Photos/Getty

A total solar eclipse observed from the Harvard College Observatory in March 1970.

Telescopes ready

ITAR-TASS/Alamy

American scientists prepared to observe the total solar eclipse in Kamen-na-Obi, in the Altai region of the USSR.

Partial band

Guillermo Gonzalez/Alamy

The annular solar eclipse in May 1984 captured through a telescope.

A rose by any name

Steve Albers/NASA/Zuma

Five individual photographs, each exposed for a different radius of the sun's corona, combine here in a digital mosaic of the July 1991 total solar eclipse from Baja, California.

Look out above

Tampa Bay Times/Zuma

People viewed a partial solar eclipse in May 1994 at the Museum of Science and Industry in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Ken Helle)

Waterside view

Hemis/Alamy

Two people used paper eclipse glasses to view the August 1999 eclipse from France.

Family time

Justin Sullivan/Getty

A woman helped her great-granddaughter view a partial solar eclipse at the Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland, California, in June 2002. The moon covered two-thirds of the sun.

X-ray vision

Abid Katib/Getty

In Gaza City, viewers used X-ray prints to view the partial eclipse in March 2006. (Note that using X-ray film or photographic film to view the sun can be dangerous, and is no longer recommended.)

Observing card

China Photos/Getty

A partial solar eclipse was visible in most parts of China for about 2 hours in March 2007, and it was also visible in Japan and India. Here, a woman used a card with a solar filter embedded to view the eclipse in Changchun, Jilin province, China.

Missing bite

China Photos/Getty

The March 2007 partial solar eclipse photographed through a dark filter from Nanjing, Jiangsu province, China.

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