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Expert Voices

Hidden Time in the Art of Ed Belbruno (Photos)

space-time, big bang, ed belbruno
This painting is part of a new series by Ed Belbruno that began in late 2014. Another departure from previous work, it is the first in a series. The piece is done in an abstract expressionist style and shows a hidden dimensional aspect to reality.
(Image: © Edward Belbruno)

Josh Chamot, Expert Voices editor, contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights

Mathematician Ed Belbruno has calculated a groundbreaking trajectory to the moon and teased out the equations for a cyclical universe, and deep within the core of his inspiration is his art. His story was captured in the documentary "Painting the Way to the Moon," and in his many essays for Space.com. Below are images of Belbruno and several of his latest works. Read more about Belbruno's exploration of space-time in his latest essay, "Is the Big Bang Cycling Through Hidden Time?".

Time on two scales

Time, 16 x 26 inches, 2009, acrylic, canvas. This painting marked a departure from Belbruno's previous work. Seeming out of place to him, it was set aside. Then, in 2014 a friend noticed this painting represented two time scales, an uncanny connection to Belbruno's current cosmology research. (Credit: Edward Belbruno.)

Telling his story

Ed Belbruno completes a painting in a scene from a film about his work, "Painting the Way to the Moon." (Credit: Jacob Okada.)

Dimensions of reality

Untitled, Nov 2014, 24 x 24inches, acrylic and oil, canvas. This painting is part of a new series by Ed Belbruno that began in late 2014. Another departure from previous work, it is the first in a series. The piece is done in an abstract expressionist style and shows a hidden dimensional aspect to reality. (Credit: Edward Belbruno.)

Revelation of the hidden

Untitled 2, Jan 2015, 30 x 60 inches, acrylic and oil, canvas. Part of Belbruno's recent art series, viewers of this piece can get lost in the scene among the curves and forms, showing another aspect of reality not normally evident to our senses. (Credit: Edward Belbruno.)

Mathematics and the watcher

X2, April 2015, 16 x 20inches, acrylic on art board. This is the first piece by Ed Belbruno in his latest art series, a big departure from any previous work, both in concept and color. Although abstract, it also can be viewed more conceptually as a landscape with equations in the sky, overlooking structures of some sort. A face in the sky overlooks the scene. (Credit: Edward Belbruno.)

In his element

Ed Belbruno at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, discussing mathematics and cosmology. (Credit: Aggie Sung.)

Our watcher

X3, May 2015, 30 x 40inches, acrylic on canvas. One of the larger and more involved pieces from Ed Belbruno's latest art series. (Credit: Edward Belbruno.) 

Note: Meet Belbruno on Oct. 22 in New York at a Space.com gallery showing highlighting his work. Belbruno's art is available exclusively in the Space.com store.

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