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See NASA's LADEE Moon Probe Launch from Virginia (Visibility Maps)

LADEE and the Moon Artist's Concept

NASA Ames/Dana Berry

On Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, NASA will launch the LADEE moon dust mission from the agency's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Va. The launch will occur at 11:27 p.m. ET (0327 Sept. 7 GMT) and may be visible across a wide reagion of the U.S. East Coast. See sky maps for potential viewing locations and launch trajectories in the slides that follow.

This image above shows an artist's depiction of NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) observatory in space with the moon in the distance. [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

Visibility Map for LADEE Launch

NASA's Wallops Flight Facility (via Facebook)

Visibility map for the LADEE launch on September 6, 2013 at 11:27 p.m. EDT (0327 Sept. 7 GMT). [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

Time of LADEE First Sighting Map

Carlos Niederstrasser/Orbital Sciences Corp.

This map shows the rough time at which you can first expect to see the Minotaur V rocket after it is launched. It represents the time at which the rocket will reach 5 degrees above the horizon and varies depending on your location along the east coast. We have selected 5 degrees as it is unlikely that you'll be able to view the rocket when it is below 5 degrees due to buildings, vegetation, and other terrain features. As a reference, when you look at your fist with your arm fully outstretched, it spans approximately 10 degrees. [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

LADEE Launch Viewing Maximum Elevation Map

Carlos Niederstrasser/Orbital Sciences Corp.

This map shows the maximum elevation (degrees above the horizon) that the Minotaur V rocket will reach depending on your location along the east coast. The further away you are from the launch site, the closer to the horizon the rocket will be. As a reference, when you look at your fist with your arm fully outstretched, it spans approximately 10 degrees. [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

Potential View of LADEE Launch from US Capitol Building

Carlos Niederstrasser/Orbital Sciences Corp.

The potential view from the front steps of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C., on launch night. Launch is not over populated areas. [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

Potential View of LADEE Launch from the Lincoln Memorial

Carlos Niederstrasser/Orbital Sciences Corp.

The potential view (weather permitting) from the Lincoln Memorial on launch night. Launch is not over populated areas. [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

Potential View of LADEE Launch from the World War II Memorial

Carlos Niederstrasser/Orbital Sciences Corp.

The potential view (weather permitting) from the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C., on launch night. Launch is not over populated areas. [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

Potential View of LADEE Launch from Newseum

Carlos Niederstrasser/Orbital Sciences Corp.

The potential view (weather permitting) from the Newseum on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., on launch night. Launch is not over populated areas. [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

Potential View of LADEE Launch from NASA Headquarters

Carlos Niederstrasser/Orbital Sciences Corp.

The potential view (weather permitting) from NASA Headquarters on E Street SW in Washington, D.C., on launch night. Launch is not over populated areas. [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

Potential View of LADEE Launch from RIchmond International Raceway

Carlos Niederstrasser/Orbital Sciences Corp.

The potential view (weather permitting) from Virginia's Richmond Interational Raceway at the Rockets to Racecars event on launch night. Launch is not over populated areas. [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

Potential View of LADEE Launch from Peace Circle

Carlos Niederstrasser/Orbital Sciences Corp.

The potential view (weather permitting) from Peace Circle in Washington, D.C., on launch night. Launch is not over populated areas. [Read The Full Skywatching Guide Here]

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