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See stunning pictures of the Geminid meteor shower of 2021

 A view of the sky over Cape Vyatlina on Russky Island, Russia, during the peak of the 2021 Geminid meteor shower.
A view of the sky over Cape Vyatlina on Russky Island, Russia, during the peak of the 2021 Geminid meteor shower. (Image credit: Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images)

Social media and photo sites were full of "shooting star" watchers overnight.

The Geminid meteor shower reached its peak Monday (Dec. 13), sparking amateurs and professionals alike to catch a few images of the show. At its peak, there can be as many as 100 to 150 meteors an hour.

This year, skywatchers had a bright waxing moon to contend with, moving to a full phase on Saturday (Dec. 18), but it looks like at least a few bright meteors managed to outshine it. There may still be some bright meteors later in the week, too, so if you were clouded out or busy you may have a chance to see a few Geminids.

Related: How meteor showers work (infographic)

On the professional photography side, Xue Bing in China caught a bright meteor streaking towards the horizon in Bazhou, Xinjiang province, while in Russia, Yuri Smityuk spotted a streaker over Vladivostok, near the Sea of Japan.

A meteor streaks across the night sky in Nashville, Tennessee, United States as the Geminid meteor shower reached its maximum in the early morning of December 14, 2021.

A meteor streaks across the night sky in Nashville, Tennessee, as the Geminid meteor shower reached its maximum in the early morning of Dec. 14, 2021.  (Image credit: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

A little closer to home, Tayfun Coskun caught a meteor streaking across the sky in Nashville, framed by bare trees on the horizon. And photographers across the world shared their experiences on Twitter, as you can see by a sampling of tweets below.

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One of the more spectacular examples came from Dave DiCello (opens in new tab), who caught a meteor appearing to careen towards the city of Pittsburgh (although rest assured, the meteor was too small to make it to the ground, and too high up to pose any threat.) 

And despite the bright conditions, some people reported seeing fireballs, and at least one photographer caught the characteristic green flash of a bright meteor.

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If you're hoping to capture photos of the Geminid meteors, our guide on how to photograph meteor showers can help. You can also use our best cameras for astrophotography and best lenses for astrophotography guides to prepare for the next meteor shower.

Editor's note: If you snap an amazing photo of a Geminid meteor or any other night-sky sight and you'd like to share it with Space.com for a story or image gallery, send images, comments and location information to spacephotos@space.com.

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Elizabeth Howell, Ph.D., is a contributing writer for Space.com (opens in new tab) since 2012. As a proud Trekkie and Canadian, she tackles topics like spaceflight, diversity, science fiction, astronomy and gaming to help others explore the universe. Elizabeth's on-site reporting includes two human spaceflight launches from Kazakhstan, and embedded reporting from a simulated Mars mission in Utah. She holds a Ph.D. and M.Sc (opens in new tab). in Space Studies from the University of North Dakota, and a Bachelor of Journalism from Canada's Carleton University. Her latest book, NASA Leadership Moments, is co-written with astronaut Dave Williams. Elizabeth first got interested in space after watching the movie Apollo 13 in 1996, and still wants to be an astronaut someday.