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The 'evening star' Venus swings by the crescent moon today. Here's how to see it.

The crescent moon and Venus once again make for a gorgeous sight at the end of January. On Jan. 28, you'll find the pair hovering about 4 degrees apart in the southwest in the hour or so after sunset.
The crescent moon and Venus once again make for a gorgeous sight at the end of January. On Jan. 28, you'll find the pair hovering about 4 degrees apart in the southwest in the hour or so after sunset. (Image credit: NASA JPL)

Tonight (Jan. 28), you can catch the crescent moon (opens in new tab) make a close approach to Venus in the evening sky. 

The waxing moon was in conjunction with Venus (opens in new tab) — meaning that the pair shared the same celestial longitude — at 2:29 a.m. EST (0729 GMT). Though the pair were below the horizon for skywatchers in the U.S. at the time, they will still appear close together after sunset. 

In New York City, for example, Venus will set at 8:25 p.m. local time, or 3 hours and 17 minutes after sunset, according to timeanddate.com (opens in new tab). The moon sets just a few minutes later, at 8:51 p.m. local time. 

Related: The brightest visible planets in January's night sky (opens in new tab)

The four-day-old moon, which reached new phase (opens in new tab) on Friday (Jan. 24), will pass just over 4 degrees to the south of Venus, according to the skywatching site In-The-Sky.org (opens in new tab). Look for the pair as the dusk fades, when they will be about 30 degrees above the southwest horizon in the constellation Aquarius (opens in new tab). (For reference, your clenched fist held at arm's length measures about 10 degrees wide.)

Venus will be shining at magnitude -4.1, or brighter than even the brightest stars (opens in new tab) in Earth's night sky. The "evening star (opens in new tab)" will be at its greatest brightness in April, when it will be at magnitude -4.5.

Editor's Note: If you snap an amazing night sky picture and would like to share it with Space.com's readers, send your photos, comments, and your name and location to spacephotos@space.com (opens in new tab).

Email Hanneke Weitering at hweitering@space.com or follow her @hannekescience. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

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Hanneke Weitering is an editor at Space.com with 10 years of experience in science journalism. She has previously written for Scholastic Classroom Magazines, MedPage Today and The Joint Institute for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After studying physics at the University of Tennessee in her hometown of Knoxville, she earned her graduate degree in Science, Health and Environmental Reporting (SHERP) from New York University. Hanneke joined the Space.com team in 2016 as a staff writer and producer, covering topics including spaceflight and astronomy. She currently lives in Seattle, home of the Space Needle, with her cat and two snakes. In her spare time, Hanneke enjoys exploring the Rocky Mountains, basking in nature and looking for dark skies to gaze at the cosmos.