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The best sci-fi movies and TV shows to stream on Amazon Prime in July

The best sci-fi shows and movies on Amazon Prime for July 2021.
The best sci-fi shows and movies on Amazon Prime for July 2021. (Image credit: Amazon Prime)

A veritable treasure trove of sci-fi is available to watch on Amazon Prime; much is free to view with your standard subscription and even more is available if you feel like paying a little more. So settle back and soak up some superb sci-fi from the safety of your sofa.

Sci-fi movies

1) Alien

The crew of the USCSS Nostromo commercial towing vehicle, Kane, Parker, Dallas, Brett, Ripley, Brett and Ash.

The crew of the USCSS Nostromo commercial towing vehicle, Kane, Parker, Dallas, Brett, Ripley, Brett and Ash. (Image credit: 20th Century Fox)

Synopsis: The crew of a deep space commercial hauling ship is unwittingly re-routed while in hypersleep to investigate the origins of a mysterious transmission. Once awake, they travel to the surface of a desolate planet and discover a giant derelict spacecraft…and a thoroughly unpleasant alien parasite. Things get progressively worse after that.

Why you should watch: Simply put, "Alien" is not only one of the best sci-fi movies ever made, it's one the best movies ever made. Period. The production design is extraordinary, the story is simple but brilliantly effective, the tension is built up flawlessly and the performances from every member of the cast are incredible. Sigourney Weaver, Veronica Cartwright, John Hurt, Tom Skerritt, Yaphet Kotto, Harry Dean Stanton and Ian Holm star in what is probably Ridley Scott's finest film. 

Free with Amazon Prime

2) Armstrong

Armstrong's cool composure while handling of his X-15 made him a prime candidate for the moon landing.

Armstrong's cool composure while handling of his X-15 made him a prime candidate for the moon landing. (Image credit: Gravitas Ventures)

Synopsis: This dramatic, moving and insightful documentary tells the definitive life story of Neil Armstrong: from his childhood in rural Ohio, through aerial combat in Korea, to his first steps on the Moon and the reluctant celebrity status that followed. 

Why you should watch: Even before Neil Armstrong became the first human being to set foot on the surface of an entirely different celestial body, he was a unique individual. This enlightening, high-quality documentary, in which Harrison Ford voices many of Armstrong's personal letters, tells the story of the man, rather than just focusing on the Apollo 11 mission. He was a laser-focused human being with an exceptional ability to keep his cool under very difficult circumstances. Not only was he an astronaut, he was a top-notch engineer and an extremely skilled test pilot. There's so much footage that we've certainly never seen before and when you compare this to say, the movie "First Man," it actually paints a more layered picture of this quiet but supremely capable human being.

Free with Amazon Prime

3) Barbarella

"Flash Gordon" meets…er, "Flesh Gordon"? "Barbarella is an iconic classic and a reflection of the 1960s zeitgeist.

"Flash Gordon" meets ..."Flesh Gordon"? "Barbarella" is an iconic classic and a reflection of the 1960s zeitgeist. (Image credit: Paramount Pictures)

Synopsis: In the 41st century, astronaut Barbarella (Jane Fonda) has been assigned by the President of Earth to rescue renowned scientist Durand Durand (Milo O'Shea), who has vanished in the Tau Ceti region. He has invented the Positronic Ray, a powerful weapon that Earth leaders fear will fall into the wrong hands. Along the way, Barbarella has to deal with things like a machine that causes death by sexual pleasure, a lesbian queen who can make her fantasies take form in her Chamber of Dreams and a group of ladies smoking a giant shisha that dispenses Essence of Man by way of a poor victim imprisoned in its glass globe.

Why you should watch: This classic, campy 1968 movie, based on the comic strip by Jean-Claude Forest, is without a doubt the sexiest sci-fi ever made, it's an interesting reflection of the era, when the world was a bit more footloose and fancy free. The special effects are actually quite impressive considering when this was made and it should be regarded as an iconic classic and an entertaining chapter in the history of science fiction. Treat yourself to an edible before you watch this, it'll make it much more entertaining.

Free with Amazon Prime

4) Battle Beyond the Stars

This big-budget B-movie from 1980 plays an important part in the history of science fiction cinema.

This big-budget B-movie from 1980 plays an important part in the history of science fiction cinema. (Image credit: New World Pictures)

Synopsis: In what is to all intents and purposes "Seven Samurai" set in space, a young farmer, Shad (Richard Thomas) sets out to recruit a band of mercenaries to defend his peaceful planet, which is under threat of invasion by the evil tyrant Sador (John Saxon) and his army of Malmori mutants. Sador possesses a deadly "stellar converter" beam weapon on his formidable warship and threatens to use if the people of Akira don't surrender to his rule. 

Why you should watch: This B-movie with a bigger budget than most has an important part to play in the history of sci-fi cinema. It launched the career of James Cameron, who was working in the art department and this is where he met his future production partner and wife Gale Anne Hurd, which resulted in "The Terminator" and "Aliens." Producer and director and B-movie maestro, Roger Corman, sadly had to use much of his budget just to pay overpriced stars George Peppard and Robert Vaughn, but the end result is still good fun, plus the James Horner soundtrack is great (this was his first major motion picture score).

Free with Amazon Prime

5) The Blackout

Written by Ilya Kulikov and directed by Egor Baranov, "The Blackout" is an action-packed sci-fi thriller that's worth a watch.

Written by Ilya Kulikov and directed by Egor Baranov, "The Blackout" is an action-packed sci-fi thriller that's worth a watch. (Image credit: TV3/Central Partnership Sales House)

Synopsis: The Earth has been attacked by a mysterious force from space, but it's not like any attack you might imagine. The whole planet has been robbed of power and plunged into darkness; nothing works, anywhere…with the exception of a random circular area of eastern Europe, encompassing part of western Russia, southern Finland, Belarus and northern Ukraine. It turns out that the position of the Moon relative to Earth shielded this part of the world from the deadly energy weapon fired from far outside the range of lunar orbit. Now, as the actual alien invasion begins, military forces gather inside the "circle of life" in a desperate effort to save all life as we know it.

Why you should watch: This is a Russian indie sci-fi flick that is extremely enjoyable. It has high production values despite not having a blockbuster budget, the performances are good and an unusual story with a good twist at the end makes this a solid sci-fi movie worth making time for. 

Free with Amazon Prime

6) I, Robot

One or two clichés aside, "I, Robot" is not entirely awful sci-fi action flick with Alan Tudyk stealing the show.

One or two clichés aside, "I, Robot" is not entirely awful sci-fi action flick with Alan Tudyk stealing the show. (Image credit: 20th Century Fox)

Synopsis: Set in the near future, where every household has a robot assistant/servant, techno-phobic detective Del Spooner (Will Smith) heads the investigation of the apparent suicide of leading robotics scientist Dr. Alfred Lanning (James Cromwell). Unconvinced of the motive, the investigation into Lanning's death reveals a trail of secrets and agendas within the giant US Robotics corporation and suspicions of murder. Little does Spooner know that his investigation would lead to uncovering a much larger threat to humanity.

Why you should watch: It's a big-budget sci-fi blockbuster yes, it's a Will Smith movie after all, but despite a few minor annoyances (mainly Shia LaBeouf) this is not entirely awful. The movie's plot loosely revolves around the so-called three laws of robotics, laid out by Isaac Asimov. (A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. Secondly, a robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the first law. Finally, a robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the first or second law.) There are some nice ideas and a stellar performance from Alan Tudyk as the robot Sonny. 

Free with Amazon Prime

7) Runaway

"Runaway" could be thought of as Michael Crichton's second near-future, out-of-control robots story following "Westworld."

This could be considered Michael Crichton's second near-future, out-of-control robots story after "Westworld. (Image credit: Tristar Pictures)

Synopsis: Set in the near future, robots are commonplace in society, in every home and working in factories and on farms. John Ramsey (Tom Selleck) works in a special division of the police department called the Runaway Squad that solely deals with malfunctioning droids. He and his new partner, Officer Thompson (Cynthia Rhodes) stumble onto the homicidal plot of an insane scientist (played deliciously by Gene Simmons) to create killer robots. 

Why you should watch: Still enjoying the success of "Magnum PI" on TV, this was an interesting move by Selleck and he carries it off very well. The 80s were an exciting testbed for sci-fi — and in fact Amazon has a number of classic examples available to watch — and this is fun, action-adventure romp, with some creative ideas. (It's written and directed by Michael Crichton.) Rather than simply being an overelaborate robot repair team, it seems every time a domestic droid malfunctions, it somehow threaten a human life. Simmons' evil scientist character also has a cool handgun that locks onto a target and fires target-seeking projectiles. 

Free with Amazon Prime

8) Saturn 3

"Saturn 3" like many other sci-fi movies of the period should be enjoyed and considered as a foundation of contemporary sci-fi cinema

"Saturn 3" like many other sci-fi movies of the period should be enjoyed and considered as a piece of history. (Image credit: Associated Film Distribution)

Synopsis: In the distant future, a husband-wife scientific team living on one of Saturn's moons to grow food for the starving Earth, have their isolation shattered when a certified psychotic member of the resupply mission murders and takes the place of the pilot scheduled to make the shuttle run. He brings with him Hector, the latest in the Demigod robot series: an eight-foot tall machine that he can directly interface with over a neural link. As a result of being connected to the mind of this utterly insane individual, the robot begins to take on his homicidal habits.

Why you should watch: This is bonkers sci-fi at its very best. We've mentioned before that the late 70s and early 80s was an interesting, experimental period in science fiction and this is a great example of the more out there attempts. Farrah Fawcett and Douglas Kirk star with Harvey Keitel playing the mentally unstable Benson masquerading as the murdered Captain James. 

Free with Amazon Prime

9) The Tomorrow War

If you're a budding volcanologist, struggling to get recognition from your peers, then this movie is for you.

If you're a budding volcanologist, struggling to get recognition from your peers, then this movie is for you.  (Image credit: Amazon)

Synopsis: Set in the present day, a group of time-travelling soldiers from the future appear during the Qatar World Cup final and announce that in just 30 years in the future, all of mankind is on the brink of annihilation by race of particularly unpleasant aliens. Among those chosen to travel forward in time is former soldier (naturally) and schoolteacher Dan Forester (Chris Pratt) who teams up with both seasoned veterans and raw recruits to save the human race.

Why you should watch: This is very much a popcorn sci-fi blockbuster, equal to the likes of "Independence Day" or "Battle Los Angeles," and in fact you will notice the influence of other sci-fi movies like "The Thing" to "Edge of Tomorrow" and "Millennium" throughout. And while this won't win any awards for the story writing, it's wanton destruction on a massive scale. 

Free with Amazon Prime

10) What We Left behind: Looking Back at Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Writers from "DS9" including Ira Steven Behr and Ron Moore create a hypothetical new series first episode

Writers from "DS9" including Ira Steven Behr and Ron Moore create a hypothetical new series first episode (Image credit: Paramount+/455 Films)

Synopsis: Showrunner Ira Steven launched the fundraising campaign a couple of years ago and what followed was an incredible tribute documentary looking at the history of "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine" that features interviews with almost every member of the cast, including Nana Visitor, Terry Farrell, Rene Auberjonois, Alexander Siddig and Andrew Robinson. Sadly though, Avery Brooks' contribution is limited to archive footage.

Why you should watch: If you're a fan of "DS9" than this is a must-watch; not only are the insights intriguing and often emotional, but the fictional first episode of a hypothetical new series, crafted together in a writers room packed full of the best writers in "Star Trek" is inspired. There's a look back at the early reviews (and how negative they were), the casting decisions and the issues faced throughout production. This documentary also marks the first time any footage from "DS9" has been remastered in high definition including a portion of the main battle sequence from "Sacrifice Of Angels" (S06, E06).

Free with ads via IMDB TV

Sci-fi TV shows

1) The Expanse

Synopsis: A police detective in the asteroid belt, the first officer of an interplanetary ice freighter, and an earth-bound United Nations executive slowly discover a vast conspiracy that threatens the Earth's rebellious colony on the asteroid belt. Along the way, evidence of alien life is discovered and a series of ring gates located near Uranus are unlocked that lead to totally new locations through the universe. Meanwhile, the major factions in the Solar System: Earth, Mars, the Outer Planets Authority and the Belters, fight amongst themselves and ultimately threaten all life on Earth.

Why you should watch: "The Expanse" has well and truly earned its place among the titans of TV sci-fi, up there along with "Battlestar Galactica" and "Babylon 5." It's by far the most cerebral sci-fi currently on television. You can catch up on everything that happened in Season 1 to 3 here, and a lot happened. Then you can catch up with everything that happened in Season 4 here. Personally, we believe seasons 1 and 2 were ever so slightly better than 3 and 4, but that doesn't in any way mean they're not worth watching. Then along came Season 5 and blew everyone's socks off. It is brilliant. The plot is incredibly complex and engaging and the individual performances are exceptional. Forget any Krell hologram-making mind machine on Altair IV, watching "The Expanse" will permanently double your IQ.

Free with Amazon Prime

2) Farscape

Out of the blue came this interesting, innovative and slightly insane sci-fi series from Australia…and it rocked.

Out of the blue came this interesting, innovative and slightly insane sci-fi series from Australia ... and it rocked. (Image credit: Jim Henson Television)

Synopsis: During an experimental test flight in low Earth orbit, astronaut John Crichton (Ben Browder) is catapulted through a wormhole and into a different galaxy and a distant part of the universe. He finds himself part of a crew of fugitives aboard a living, biomechanical spaceship called Moya, running from a tyrannical military force, called the Peacekeepers, all the while hoping that one day, he might figure out a way to get home.

Why you should watch: "Farscape" was unlike anything that had come before it; the show was bold, brilliant and a little bit barmy. In a time where computer generated VFX were entering a new chapter, "Farscape" relied heavily on practical effects, especially where alien creatures were concerned and the result was amazing. A solid cast of characters, some spaced-out plots, well-placed humor and for the most part, good writing, makes this sci-fi show extremely enjoyable. 

Free with Amazon Prime

3) The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Still probably one of the most quoted sci-fi shows ever, watch this, then read all the books. You owe it to yourself. (Image credit: BBC)

Synopsis: Arthur Dent's house has been scheduled for demolition to make way for a new bypass, but this is the least of his problems as it turns out that the planet Earth has bee scheduled for demolition to make way for a new hyperspace express route. Thankfully though, it also turns out that his friend Ford Prefect isn't from Guildford after all, but in fact from a small planet somewhere in the vicinity of Betelgeuse, and has been long aware of the Earth's impending demise. Together they manage to escape and along the way learn the true history of the universe.

Why you should watch: This one is a real treat and will unquestionably appeal to fans of British humor and more specifically, the epic humor of Douglas Adams. Made in 1981, this is still (tragically) the best adaptation that's been brought to either the big or small screen. The visual effects certainly haven't stood the test of time, but that's not why you're watching it; you're watching it because it shows beautifully how the relationship between Arthur Dent (Simon Jones) and Ford Prefect (David Dixon) develops. 

4) Humans

The quality of writing, high production values and stellar casting makes "Humans" an enjoyable sci-fi thriller. (Image credit: Channel 4 Television)

Synopsis: Set in a parallel present, the latest must-have gadget for any middle-class family is a "synth" — a technologically advanced, a highly-developed robotic servant, eerily similar to its human equivalent. In the hope of transforming the way they live, one strained suburban family purchases a refurbished synth only to discover that sharing life with a machine has far-reaching and chilling consequences. 

Why you should watch: Based on the Swedish science fiction drama Äkta människor, this was an adaptation written by the British team Sam Vincent and Jonathan Brackley, that lasted for three, eight-episode seasons before it was sadly cancelled. The concepts in this show aren't particularly groundbreaking, but what makes it compelling viewing is the quality of writing, high production values and stellar casting. It's a compelling analysis of human nature and our reactions to technology and it beautifully reflects so many issues facing us, in the real world, today. 

Free with Amazon Prime

5) The Man in the High Castle

Rufus Sewell, who plays Obergruppenführer John Smith, is a definite highlight of Amazon's "The Man in the High Castle."

Rufus Sewell, who plays Obergruppenführer John Smith, is a definite highlight of Amazon's "The Man in the High Castle." (Image credit: Amazon)

might look like if World War II had ended differently. In this dystopian scenario, the Axis powers won the war, leading to the USA being divided into three zones: Imperial Japanese, Nazi and a buffer zone between the two. Despite the oppression, hope emerges when some mysterious cans of film turn up that seem to show a parallel world — and even more bizarrely, footage of different versions of the same people. A woman, Juliana Crain (Alexa Davalos) believes the films contain the key to freedom and is determined to find their elusive guardian — the man in the high castle.

Why you should watch: Alt-history is a difficult genre to perfect without descending into a cascade of clichés. If you're a fan however, you should definitely check out the works of Harry Turtledove, a writer who nails it every single time. This show can be hard going at times and the Juliana Crain character can be extremely frustrating. That said, Rufus Sewell, who plays Obergruppenführer John Smith, is magnificent to watch. There are four seasons, and yes, the show does dip a little bit in the middle, but it picks up in the fourth season. Stick with it.

Free with Amazon Prime

6) Space: 1999

Aside, obviously, from the magnificent Martin Landau, the other star of Space: 1999 was the Eagle transporter.

Aside, obviously, from the magnificent Martin Landau, the other star of Space: 1999 was the Eagle transporter. (Image credit: Gerry Anderson)

Synopsis: Moonbase Alpha is a research colony nestled in the Lunar crater Plato. Along with scientific study, it also monitors silos of atomic waste from Earth stored on the Moon's far side. On September 13th 1999, disaster strikes; a build up of magnetic energy causes an explosive chain-reaction of the waste, blasting the Moon out of Earth's orbit and off the plane of the ecliptic, out of the Solar System. The inhabitants of Moonbase Alpha are trapped, unable to return to Earth and wander the galaxy on their unique celestial spacecraft. 

Why you should watch: From the mind of Gerry Anderson, who also gave us "Thunderbirds," this one benefitted from an amazing cast, including the phenomenal Martin Landau, together with Barbara Bain and Nick Tate. The first season is currently available to watch and while many of the practical effects look dated today, don't forget that this show — and especially the first season — contained some pretty horrific scenes, in particular, "Dragon's Den" (S01, E08), that mentally scarred many young sci-fi fans at the time. 

Free with ads via IMDB TV

7) Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

"Deep Space Nine" took "Trek" in a new direction and consequently made it much more interesting.

"Deep Space Nine" took "Trek" in a new direction and consequently made it much more interesting. (Image credit: CBS)

Synopsis: Adventures abound for the crew of Deep Space Nine, one of the most important space stations in the Alpha Quadrant. Built by the Bajorans for the Cardassians and now under Federation administration, its location next to strategically vital wormhole makes it the center of all social and political interest in the region.  

Why you should watch: This was the second series to be set in the 24th century, with events that took place concurrently to those in "The Next Generation," but this was different, instead of a traditional starship setting, it took place aboard a space station. Despite arguably suspicious origins, "Deep Space Nine" quickly carved out its own identity. The Dominian War story arc is enthralling and this incarnation also paid more visits to the Mirror Universe than any other "Trek" series. 

Free with Amazon Prime

8) Star Trek: Enterprise

Long before there were fleets of starships, there was just one — the Enterprise NX-01.

Undoubtedly "Enterprise" is the most underrated "Star Trek" show, yet it's stood the test of time better than most.  (Image credit: CBS)

Synopsis: Long before there were fleets of starships, there was just one, the Enterprise NX-01, humanity's first warp 5 capable starship. The crew of this historic vessel tentatively steps forth into the unknown and begins to explore the galaxy and seek peaceful relations with alien races.

Why you should watch: This was the first new "Star Trek" show to be a prequel to "The Original Series" and contextually set in the past, which is refreshing. "Enterprise" is without question the most underrated "Star Trek" series and it was tragically cancelled before its time was due. There were no magic wands that could fix warp engines, we saw the regular need for environment suits and even the use of transporters was kept to an absolute minimum. It was a back-to-basics "Trek" and consequently it was extremely effective. Some of the very best episodes of any "Trek" are in "Enterprise," including the augments story arc and by far the best visit to the Mirror Universe in "In a Mirror, Darkly" (S04, E18 & E19).

Free with Amazon Prime

9) Tales From the Loop

The visual style of the show has been heavily influenced by Swedish artist Simon Stålenhag and it works extremely effectively.

The visual style of the show has been heavily influenced by Swedish artist Simon Stålenhag and it works extremely effectively. (Image credit: Amazon)

Synopsis: A small backwater town has a scientific research facility built underneath it, exactly like the Large Hadron Collider at the CERN facility that lies on the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. But the people of this town experience all kinds of weird events and strange phenomena. Each episode follows one townsperson, or a particular group of townspeople, and their experiences with "the loop."

Why you should watch: What an incredibly brilliant idea. Why wouldn't a super-accelerated particle smasher designed to uncover the mysteries of the universe not create super-weird events and interdimensional portals?! The premise of this show is quite possibly one of the most simple and effective we've ever seen. Using the existing notion of a sub-atomic research facility, which we're all already familiar with, as a frame for a "Twilight Zone"-style, "X-Files"-esque, episodic show featuring stories about the "strange and unexplained" is genius. Strong writing and exceptional casting make the week-by-week adventures of the fictional town of Mercer, Ohio addictive viewing. 

Free with Amazon Prime

10)  Thunderbirds

Thunderbird 2, a gigantic, gravity-defying aircraft could carry all manner of specialized rescue machinery in its cargo hold.

Thunderbird 2, a gigantic, gravity-defying aircraft could carry all manner of specialized rescue machinery in its cargo hold. (Image credit: Gerry Anderson)

Synopsis: In the near future, a billionaire philanthropist has used his extensive knowledge, resources and wealth to create a non-profit, independently operated rescue organization. Using specifically designed, technologically advanced vehicles, including two supersized aircraft, two space vehicles and a submarine, the father — Jeff Tracey and his five sons, Scott, John, Virgil, Gordon and Alan — constantly monitor events around the world and then selflessly rush to the scene, wherever it might be, to save lives and avert total disaster. 

Why you should watch: The man behind "Thunderbirds," Gerry Anderson, also gave the world "Space: 1999," "UFO," "Captain Scarlet" and "Space Precinct." Some of his shows were live action and others, like "Thunderbirds," were made using puppets. This was done largely to make the demanding special effects scenes possible and as a result, this show features some of the very best model work ever seen on either the large or small screen.  The original "Thunderbirds" show is a classic and should be enjoyed as such. If only Elon Musk or Jeff Bezos had watched this show growing up; surely this would be more effective than some lame tunnel linking Las Vegas to Los Angeles that no one asked for.

Free with Amazon Prime

11) Upload

No extravagant sets here, instead a straightforward premise, with some, simple well-placed VFX, make "Upload" compelling viewing. (Image credit: Amazon)

Synopsis: When a computer programmer Nathan Brown (Robbie Amell) dies prematurely, his socialite girlfriend pays the expensive fee to have his consciousness uploaded to the exclusive Lake View resort for the recently deceased. However, depending on what she chooses to accept to pay for, he finds some simple elements of his life are restricted. As Nathan adjusts to digital heaven, he begins to develop feelings for with his customer service representative in the real world, Nora (Andy Allo). She is struggling with the pressures of her job, her dying father who does not want to be uploaded and her own growing feelings for Nathan while slowly coming to believe that Nathan was murdered.

Why you should watch: "Upload" was with a doubt one of the highlights of last year; creator Greg Daniels ("Parks and Recreation" and "The Office") did a phenomenal job of creating a believable, dark comedy, set in the very near future, with so many worryingly realistic plot elements. Add in characters that you quickly become invested in and this is an enjoyable, addictive and thoroughly amusing must-watch show.

So there you have it! A look at our picks for the best sci-fi movies and TV shows on  Amazon Prime. You can sign up for Amazon Prime here. After the 30-day free trial, a subscription costs $12.99 per month or $119 for the year.

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Scott Snowden
When Scott's application to the NASA astronaut training program was turned down, he was naturally upset ... as any 6-year-old boy would be. He chose instead to write as much as he possibly could about science, technology and space exploration. He graduated from The University of Coventry and received his training on Fleet Street in London. He still hopes to be the first journalist in space. You can follow Scott on Twitter @LorumIpsum.

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: community@space.com.

  • Alien8
    Don't bother with The Tomorrow War, we got half way through and gave up, the plot holes are so numerous and huge that it takes complete suspension of your intelligence to watch the whole thing.
    Reply
  • GeoXXX
    “Boy that was a great decision to turn “I, Robot” into a Will Smith movie!”

    Said no one, ever.
    Reply
  • Mergatroid
    Totally enjoyed The Tomorrow War. Great production values, and the acting is second to none. Great twist in the middle. The editing was a little off in one spot as something happened and I didn't see any explanation for it, but other than that is was a great movie.
    Reply
  • Helio
    Mergatroid said:
    Totally enjoyed The Tomorrow War. Great production values, and the acting is second to none. Great twist in the middle. The editing was a little off in one spot as something happened and I didn't see any explanation for it, but other than that is was a great movie.
    Yeah. I liked it because it reminded me of Independence Day.
    I thought it clever how they used the time stream idea to limit time travel to normal time events for both locations.
    Reply