"Cosmos: Possible Worlds," the highly anticipated next season of the groundbreaking science TV series, is shaping up to be something special.

The upcoming season, which is set to premiere in the spring of 2019, will continue the show's legacy exploring the marvels of our expanding universe. In a new trailer, released Saturday (July 21), astrophysicist and popular science communicator Neil deGrasse Tyson makes a triumphant return as the show's host.

In the trailer, Tyson drops a few hints about what the new season might entail. "We inhabit the cosmos of undiscovered dimensions and paradoxical realities," Tyson says in the video as he appears to replicate, simultaneously eating a slice of pizza, reading a book and dancing. "We live on one level of perception, but there are others."

In the video, Tyson suggests that the new season might explore the search for extraterrestrial life. "We search the heavens for signs of intelligent life. But what would we do if we found it? Are we ready for first contact?" he says.

The trailer promises that the new season will entail "new voyages to never-before-seen worlds" and the exploration of "new realms of the imagination." And, if this season is anything like the first, viewers are sure to be completely captivated by our universe and the way Tyson makes even complex scientific topics exciting and accessible.

"Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey," the show's previous season, was created as a follow-up to "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage," a 1980 TV series co-created and hosted by legendary astronomer and science communicator Carl Sagan. Sagan's unique legacy of making the universe personal continues on through Tyson in this series.

"The heart of our show is this nucleus of hope," Ann Druyan, creator, writer, executive producer and director of the show — and Sagan's widow — says in the video about the new season.

To sum up the upcoming season, "Things are about to get epic," Tyson says in the trailer.

Email Chelsea Gohd at cgohd@space.com or follow her @chelsea_gohd. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original article on Space.com.