Apollo 15 in Photos: A Moon Landing and the 1st Lunar Car for Astronauts

Apollo 15 Crew

NASA

In this official NASA photo, the Apollo 15 emblem plays background to, from left, David R. Scott, commander; Alfred M. Worden, command model pilot; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, who make up the prime crew for the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission.

Desert Training

NASA

In March of 1971, two astronauts prepare for the upcoming Apollo 15 lunar landing mission by participating in extravehicular activity training near Taos, New Mexico. Astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, uses a scoop, and astronaut David R. Scott stands to the right holding a sample bag. The Lunar Roving Vehicle trainer sits to the left while the pair practices collecting soil samples.

Mountain Training

NASA

In December of 1970, astronaut James B. Irwin, Apollo 15 lunar module pilot, prepares for the lunar landing mission in Hawaii. During the extravehicular activity training, Irwin uses lunar surface geological tools to collect a core sample.

"Feet-On" Experience

NASA

During the December 1970 training in Hawaii, Apollo 15 backup crewmembers Richard F. Gordon, Jr., and Harrison H. Schmitt trained on an a'a' lava flow during geology training.

Driving Practice

NASA

Simulating conditions on the lunar surface, astronauts David R. Scott, commander, on the right, and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, drive the Lunar Roving Vehicle to prepare for the lunar surface extravehicular activities planned during the Apollo 15 mission. These simulations take place at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Stunning and Majestic

NASA

On May 11, 1971, the Apollo space vehicle, made of the Apollo Spacecraft 112, the Lunar Module 10 and the Saturn 510, stands 363 feet tall (110 meters) as it leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building and makes its way to Launch Complex 39 Pad A. The entire assembly, including the mobile launch tower, rides atop a massive crawler-transporter. Apollo 15, NASA's fourth manned lunar landing mission, launches July 26, 1971 carrying crewmembers David R. Scott, commander; Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot.

Tight Fit

NASA

Astronaut David R. Scott, Apollo 15 commander, in the background, sits inside the Apollo 15 Command Module with astronaut Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot. Lunar module pilot James B. Irwin, also in the module, sits out of view. The trio makes up the prime crew for the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission.

Apollo 15 Prime Crew

NASA

An official NASA photo presents the prime crew for the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission with the Lunar Rover — from left, James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot; David R. Scott, commander; and Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot.

Apollo 15 Lunar Module and Rover

NASA

At Kennedy Space Center on April 21, 1971, the Lunar Roving Vehicle and Lunar Module go through simulations. During NASA's fourth lunar landing mission, astronauts David R. Scott, commander, and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, will visit the moon's surface. Rover 1 will enable exploration of a larger area of the moon and sample collecting than prior missions.

Geology Training in AZ

NASA

In early November of 1970, astronauts David R. Scott and James B. Irwin, on the right, practice with a Lunar Roving Vehicle simulator. Scott and Irwin are two of the three prime crew for the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission. The team pause at the edge of a 30-foot deep crater at the Cinder Lake crater field in Arizona. The lunar simulation, nicknamed "Grover," was created by the United States Geological Survey.

More Driving Lessons

NASA

Inside Building 5, the Mission Simulation and Training Facility of the Manned Spacecraft Center, two of the three prime crew of the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission participate in a training session during the Lunar Roving Vehicle "one G" training. Astronaut David R. Scott, commander, stands to the right of the rover and astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, stands to the left.

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