Astrophotographer Captures Stunning Image of Sunspot and Plane
This stunning image shows a plane appearing to pass before the sun. Astrophotographer Michael Sanders captured the image from Bangkok, Thailand.
Credit: Michael Sanders

This stunning image shows a plane passing in front of the sun, with a huge sunspot visible of the face of our star. Astrophotographer Michael Sanders captured the image from Bangkok, Thailand.

"I had just set up my telescope, focused it, then snapped off a couple of photos in quick succession while waiting for the clouds to pass, and a plane goes past," Sanders wrote.

The image shows the sunspot group AR 2192. Sunspots are active areas on the sun that generally form when magnetic field lines are warped and twisted. Solar storms such as flares and coronal mass ejections erupt from sunspots, which look dark because they are cooler than the areas surrounding them.

Many of us take the sun for granted, giving it little thought until it scorches our skin or gets in our eyes. But our star is a fascinating and complex object, a gigantic fusion reactor that gives us life. How much do you know about the sun?
This image, captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on March 10, 2012, shows an active region on the sun, seen as the bright spot to the right. Designated AR 1429, the spot has so far produced three X-class flares and numerous M-class flares.
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Solar Quiz: How Well Do You Know Our Sun?
Many of us take the sun for granted, giving it little thought until it scorches our skin or gets in our eyes. But our star is a fascinating and complex object, a gigantic fusion reactor that gives us life. How much do you know about the sun?
This image, captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on March 10, 2012, shows an active region on the sun, seen as the bright spot to the right. Designated AR 1429, the spot has so far produced three X-class flares and numerous M-class flares.
0 of questions complete

Sanders used a Takahashi FSQ-85 with 1.5x adapter plus Nikon TC2 converter with Nikon D800 and Baader AstroSolar filter. ISO-200 @ 1/1000 sec.

To see more amazing night sky photos submitted by Space.com readers, visit our astrophotography archive.

Editor's note: If you have an amazing night sky photo you'd like to share for a possible story or image gallery, please contact managing editor Tariq Malik at spacephotos@space.com.

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