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Mars Rover Curiosity's 1st Month in Pictures (Gallery)

Mars Rover Curiosity's Tracks from Space

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Tracks from the first drives of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity are visible in this image captured by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The rover is seen where the tracks end. The image's color has been enhanced to show the surface details better. Image released Sept. 6, 2012.

Looking Back: Mars Rover Curiosity

NASA/JPL-Caltech

This scene shows the surroundings of the location where NASA Mars rover Curiosity arrived on the 29th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars (Sept. 4, 2012). It is a mosaic of images taken by Curiosity's Navigation Camera (Navcam) following the Sol 29 drive of 100 feet (30.5 meters). Tracks from the drive are visible in the image. For scale, Curiosity leaves parallel tracks about 9 feet (2.7 meters) apart.

Mars Rover Curiosity's Parachute from Space

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

This color view of the parachute and back shell that helped deliver NASA's Mars rover Curiosity to the Red Planet was taken by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The area where the back shell impacted the surface is darker because lighter-colored material on the surface was kicked up and displaced. Image released Sept. 6, 2012.

Mars Rover Curiosity's 1st Drive Map

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

This map shows the route driven by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity through the 29th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars (Sept. 4, 2012).

Mars Rover Curiosity's Arm Up Close

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

The left eye of the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity took this image of the camera on the rover's arm, the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), during the 30th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars (Sept. 5, 2012).

Curiosity's Longest Drive Yet

NASA/JPL-Caltech

These tracks were made on Mars by the rover Curiosity, during its longest drive yet on Sol 29, its 29th day on Mars, Sept. 5.

Tracks From Curiosity's Longest Drive

NASA/JPL-Caltech

This image was taken by the Mars rover Curiosity's left "Navcam" on Sol 29, its 29th Martian day (Sept. 5), when the rover made its longest drive yet.

Penny for Martian Thoughts: Mars Rover Curiosity

NASA/JPL-Caltech

Two instruments at the end of the robotic arm on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity will use these calibration targets attached to a shoulder joint of the arm. They include a 1909 Lincoln penny, patches of colored silicone and a metric bar measurement graphic.

Curiosity Rover Leaves Its Landing Site

NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity's rear Hazard Avoidance Camera (Hazcam) took this image on Aug. 28, 2012, after the rover made a 52-foot (16-meter) drive away from its landing site.

Curiosity Landing Site Panorama, with the Heights of Mount Sharp

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

This color panorama shows a 360-degree view of the landing site of NASA's Curiosity rover, including the highest part of Mount Sharp visible to the rover. That part of Mount Sharp is approximately 12 miles (20 kilometers) away from the rover. Scientists enhanced the color in one version to show the Martian scene as it would appear under the lighting conditions we have on Earth, which helps in analyzing the terrain. Photo released August 27, 2012.

Curiosity Rover's View of Mount Sharp Layers

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

This photo from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shows the layered geologic history of the base of Mount Sharp, the 3-mile-high mountain rising from the center of Gale Crater. Image taken on Aug. 23, 2012.

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