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Apollo-Soyuz Test Project: 1st U.S.-Russian Spaceflight Pictures

Artist's Conception of the Apollo-Soyuz Docking

NASA

Artist's conception of the Apollo-Soyuz docking in earth's orbit during the 1975 Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission.

Astronauts and Cosmonauts Sightseeing in Moscow's Red Square

NASA

A group of astronauts and their cosmonaut hosts are photographed sightseeing on Red Square in the heart of Moscow during a tour of the Soviet capital. The Americans were in the USSR to participate in Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) familiarization training on the Soyuz systems at the Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City) near Moscow. Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford (light coat, black cap), commander of the American ASTP crew, was head of the U.S. delegation to Star City. Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (on Stafford's left, light coat) is the Special Assistant to the American Technical Director of ASTP. The sightseeing group is walking in the direction of Lenin's Mausoleum. The structure in the background is the Cathedral of the Intercession (St. Basil's) Museum. The historic Kremlin complex is to the right.

Apollo-Soyuz Space Commanders

NASA

Astronaut Deke Slayton (left) and Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov are photographed together in the Soyuz Orbital Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission. They are the respective commanders of their crews.

Apollo/Saturn 18 Launch For Apollo-Soyuz Test Project

NASA

The Apollo Soyuz Test Project's (ASTP) NASA Apollo/Saturn 18 space vehicle is launched from Pad B, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 3:50 p.m., July 15, 1975. The Soviet spacecraft (Soyuz 19) was launched seven and one-half hours before the American ASTP/Apollo-Saturn 18 liftoff.

Soyuz Vehicle Launched to Begin U.S.-USSR ASTP Mission

NASA

The Soviet Soyuz space vehicle, with Cosmonauts Aleksey A. Leonov and Valeriy N. Kubasov aboard, is launched on the morning of July 15, 1975 from a pad at the Baykonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to begin the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission. The Soyuz space vehicle is composed of the three-stage launch vehicle, the two-man, three-module Soyuz spacecraft and the launch escape system.

Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Mission Seqence

NASA

An artist's concept illustrating the sequence of events which will occur during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) mission.

U.S. Crew: Apollo-Soyuz

NASA

The prime crewmen for the joint U.S.-Soviet Union space flight are, left to right, Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot; Vance D. Brand, command module pilot; and Thomas P. Stafford, commander.

Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Cutaway

NASA

Artist's drawing illustrating the internal arrangement of orbiting the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft in Earth orbit in a docked configuration during the Apollo-Soyuz Project. The four ASTP visible components are, left to right, the Apollo Command Module, the Docking Module, the Soyuz Orbital Module and the Soyuz Descent Vehicle.

Apollo Soyuz Test Project Official Emblem

NASA

This is the Official emblem of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) chosen by NASA and the Soviet Academy of Sciences. Of circular design, the emblem has the words Apollo in English and Soyuz in Russian around a center disc which depicts the two spacecraft docked together in Earth orbit. The Russian word "soyuz" means "union" in English.

Apollo-Soyuz Test Project

NASA

American and Russian spaceflyers, pictured here, came together in the historic Apollo-Soyuz Test Project of July 1975. The Americans flew on the final Saturn rocket to launch, the final Apollo spaceflight.

Soyuz Spacecraft During Apollo-Soyuz Test Project

NASA

The Soviet Soyuz spacecraft is contrasted against a black-sky background in this photograph taken in Earth orbit from the American Apollo spacecraft during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission. This view is looking toward the aft end of the Soyuz. Two solar panels protrude out from the spacecraft's Instrument Assembly Module.

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