Latest Moon Photos from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

Earthrise From Moon Feb. 1, 2014

NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been circling the moon since June 2009, using seven instruments to examine the lunar surface and its radiation. Among the probe's notable achievements is finding extensive evidence of water ice on the moon's surface. THIS PHOTO: This image, captured Feb. 1, 2014, shows a colorized view of Earth from the moon-based perspective of NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. [Read the Full Story Here]

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mosaic

NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

This new mosaic from the LRO spacecraft, released March 18, 2014, showcases the north pole in high resolution. The images run from 60 to 90 degrees north latitude, with a resolution of 6.5 feet (2 meters) per pixel. At right are images of the Thales crater. [Read the Full Story Here]

LRO Image of LADEE with Computer-Generated Image

NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University

This NASA graphic shows an artist's view of NASA's LADEE moon dust probe overlaid on a photo of the actual spacecraft captured by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (geometrically corrected). Image released Jan. 29, 2014. [Read the Full Story Here]

LRO Image of LADEE (Geometrically Corrected)

NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University

This NASA photo of the LADEE moon orbiter as seen by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter identifies key parts of the LADEE spacecraft (geometrically corrected). Image released Jan. 29, 2014. [Read the Full Story Here]

NASA's LRO Snaps a Picture of NASA's LADEE Spacecraft

NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University

NASA's LADEE moon dust probe (circled) is photographed by the agency's powerful Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in this image released on Jan. 29, 2014. The image, taken on Jan. 14, shows LADEE from a distance of 5.6 miles (9 kilometers) away as the two spacecraft passed each other as they orbited the moon. Both spacecraft are orbiting the moon with velocities near 3,600 mph (1,600 meters per second), so timing and pointing of LRO must be nearly perfect to capture LADEE in an LROC image. [Read the Full Story Here]

Close-Up of LRO Image of LADEE

NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University

This subsection of the LRO image, expanded four times, shows the smeared view of LADEE. [Read the Full Story Here]

LRO Image of LADEE (Unlabeled)

NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University

NASA's powerful Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter captured this image of the agency's LADEE lunar dust probe, about 5.6 miles beneath it, at 8:11 p.m. EST on Jan. 14, 2014. [Read the Full Story Here]

Chang'e 3 Landing Site by NASA's LRO

NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

China's Chang'e 3 moon rover (large arrow) and rover (small arrow) are shown in this view from the LROC NAC instrument of NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter just before lunar sunset on their first "day." Image released Dec. 30, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

Chang'e 3 Lander Panorama

Di Lorenzo and Kremer

This panorama shows China's Chang'e 3 moon lander and its Yutu lunar rover shortly after it drove down the ramp to the surface. Yellow lines connect craters seen in the panorama and the LROC image (taken later after the rover had moved by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter). Red lines indicate approximate field of view of the panorama. Image released on Dec. 30, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

LRO Before and After Photos of Chang'e 3 Moon Lander Site

NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) side by side imagery shows before and after landing locale of China’s Change’3 mooncraft. [Read the Full Story Here]

Chang'e 3 Landing Site Context Mosaic

NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

China's Chang'e 3 moon landing site (large white arrow) is seen here in a context view from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The small white arrows indicate wrinkle ridge and small black arrows delimit boundary between "red" mare (northeast) and "blue" mare (southwest). This image is 100 km wide and was released Dec. 30, 2013. [Read the Full Story Here]

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